Academic Culture

Leaderboard

Recognize academic and behavioral progress in an integrated leaderboard

The leaderboard is a display of both academic and behavioral progress for my students. The results are tabulated separately in the academic and behavioral games. In the academic game, the focus is on the experience points earned by students in academic activities. Experience points in the academic game are only awarded to students once they have mastered an activity. Once they have mastered the activity, points are added to the leaderboard. We review the academic leaderboard and recognize individuals who have made it to the top or who have made significant progress in the class. For the leaderboard in the behavior game, I use Classcraft to display students' points. This display can be sorted by experience points, health points, or action points depending on what is the required view. From my experience, the two leaderboards help steer a cooperative sense of competition among a lot of my students. It also motivates them to continue learning and sharing. Although much of this is external motivation at the beginning of the year, I see a shift towards internal motivation in regards to behavior and academic progress as the year continues. Students are much more willing to learn for learning's sake instead of a prize or written/verbal recognition as they become more accustomed to these behavior and academic qualities. The academic leaderboard displays the rankings of students in all three of my earth science classes. The behavior game on Classcraft is solely based on the students in that particular period.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Jessi explains how she uses, displays and engages her students in the Leaderboard.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screenshot of the Classcraft leaderboard. This leaderboard is based solely on behavioral expectations in the classroom. I can sort the leaderboard to view leaders in health, action, and experience points.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Jessi explains how she uses, displays and engages her students in the Leaderboard.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screenshot of the Classcraft leaderboard. This leaderboard is based solely on behavioral expectations in the classroom. I can sort the leaderboard to view leaders in health, action, and experience points.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
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Recognize academic and behavioral progress in an integrated leaderboard

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