Collaborative Student Groups

Start, Result, Change

Start, Result, Change is a strategy students use during math investigations to help them process what is hapenning in word problems. Using the parts or information students identify as being present, this strategy is a scaffold which enables students to process and consider what our next steps to solving a problem will be. Do we need to find the start, change, or the result?  

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Student Handout
 
 
We use the triangle shaped processing template (on paper) to consider what we know and want to know about problems. This strategy provides context in a new way. We consider the start (vertice labeled on bottom left of triangle). We then consider what information the problem has presented and is not always the same (was there anything that changed at the peak vertice of the triangle), and the outcome or result is the last vertice on the right.
Students In Action
 
 
This picture is demonstrates how students walk through the parts of the Start, Change, Result template during an investigation using materials that they have selected. Once they have gone through the parts of the problem, they can determine what piece of information is missing (Start, change or result).
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Instructional Closings
Math Journal

The Math Journal startegy is a closing sequence I use as an ongoing informal assessment at least twice a week. I typically collect at least five journals and respond back to students by writing positive praise and/or a question to have them answer about their answer. I will also conduct a quick visual check by walking around at the conclusion of a math journal session and place a sticker, grade, or smiley face on each student's journal. The Math Journal is a very open constructive tool students can use to develop their mathematical writing prowess and reinforce mathematical vocabulary. 

 
Mindsets
Freddy's Mindsets

A blended teacher’s personal mindsets shape his decisions as an educator. These mindsets influence general pedagogies, instructional approaches, and short-term decision making, alike. Check out how Freddy’s mindsets have helped to shape his blended instruction.

 
Feedback Systems
Blended Learning Peer Data Reflection

This strategy is implemented prior to our BL chat, as an on demand writing/quick write. Students are given a prompt on reflecting on their recent blended sessions, for example, A success I am having is_____, and a concern I am having is_____, prior to viewing our data. Once students are ready to share they pair up randomly in groups of 2-3 and debrief their concerns and solutions, or answer the prompt that day. I note what their concerns are, then we strategize how we can address them as a class, who are the students we can reach out to for help. Then we close by sharing/celebrating their successes. We review our class data for each of our (3 main) programs, and the highest performing students, as well as the students who have improved from the last round are rewarded with a blended learning all star certificate and all star selfie picture to take home. The all star performers may select a small educational prize, like a book, bookmark, or poster.This strategy is implemented to have students problem solve around concerns and solutions they are noticing during blended learning or within particular program lessons. These chats are very informal and solution oriented. Students go through a series of questions which aim to instill personal reflection: how have I been doing on I-Ready, My-On, and Dreambox? Why? What am I doing well? What can I do to improve? 
The big idea is to connect our data reflections to the next, in order to identify if we have reached our goal as a team.

 
 
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