Routines and Procedures

Transition Signals

Formal transitions happen twice during a double-block period. My students have to move from one section of my extra-large classroom (3 classrooms merged into one) and move to another section for a new lesson with a new teacher. My students have two minutes to transition from session to session, and we play a variety of interesting music on the surround sound stereo system to keep it fun.

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a shot of the surround sound speakers in my classroom. It may seem like overkill, but my students really enjoy the music transitions. Why not have great surround sound to facilitate it?
 
Students In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a shot of the surround sound speakers in my classroom. It may seem like overkill, but my students really enjoy the music transitions. Why not have great surround sound to facilitate it?
Aaron Kaswell
Middle School 88 Peter Rouget
Brooklyn, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Seventh grade
Similar Strategies
Routines and Procedures
Getting Started

School of One uses a Big Board outside of the classroom to display each student's daily assignment. The Big Board was designed to be like the TV screens in an airline terminal traveleres use to check their flight information. Each student's name is in the same place every day, so my students quickly get into a routine of checking the Big Board for their daily assignments. After checking the board, they come into the classroom to get their computers and get started in their assigned sections.

 
Academic Culture
Aaron's Classroom Culture

A positive classroom culture promotes student engagement, efficiency, and academic growth. Culture influences how and why students learn and ties the students to the teacher on a personal level. Check out the video below to see how Aaron’s culture impacts student achievement!


 
Independent Student Learning
Split the Difference

I frequently have my students play games as part of their learning sessions. Many students only want to play the games and do not think of creating a written records of the problems they are solving or notes on their learning. I ask my students to "split the difference" and go 50/50 on playing and note-taking. It's kind of a misnomer since there really is no "difference" to split, but the strategy makes it clear that my students should be splitting their time equally between playing a game and taking notes during that game.

 
 
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