Collaborative Student Groups

Friday Review

Friday Review is a one-day activity designed to address specific needs and growth areas for each student. Using very recent data (from Exit Tickets or formative assessments), I identify specific skills that each student needs reinforcement with. Throughout class, students rotate through either small group lessons with me or individualized activities at their tables. When students work with me, they work on remedial practice to make sure they fill in any gaps in their understanding. While working independently, students work on various activities, including targeted online practice, practice worksheets, and hands-on activities, all selected and designed based on assessment data. Though my students work with their peers at times, they rotate through activities based on their individualized schedules, working towards their personal goals. At the end of the block, all of my students take an Exit Ticket (please see the "Daily Exit Tickets" strategy video) to measure their mastery. This allows me to track their growth and to plan how to support students who need additional practice.

Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This student-facingschedule serves as a feedback system as well as a way of organizing rotations. The mastery chart outlines the level of mastery for each student in each skill for the week, while the schedule indicates assigned activities for each student based on their Friday Review math group. After each rotation, students are given a quick minute to reflect on the activity that they engaged in, checking in about their progress towards their goals. The back side also includes space for our Exit Ticket answers, allowing students to prove their progress from the class and show mastery.
Student Handout
 
 
Friday Review Guidelines are shown before our work time to remind my students of the expectations. It also includes our exit ticket for the end of class, which is used to assess mastery from the day's practice.
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This student-facingschedule serves as a feedback system as well as a way of organizing rotations. The mastery chart outlines the level of mastery for each student in each skill for the week, while the schedule indicates assigned activities for each student based on their Friday Review math group. After each rotation, students are given a quick minute to reflect on the activity that they engaged in, checking in about their progress towards their goals. The back side also includes space for our Exit Ticket answers, allowing students to prove their progress from the class and show mastery.
Student Handout
 
 
Friday Review Guidelines are shown before our work time to remind my students of the expectations. It also includes our exit ticket for the end of class, which is used to assess mastery from the day's practice.
Stephen Pham
Rocketship Si Se Puede Academy
San Jose, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Peer Evaluations

I encourage my students to evaluate their peers whenever they are involved in discourse--both in side conversations as well as in class discussions. I implemented a system of Peer Evaluations, a process that involves students using silent hand signals, in order to give my students more voice in class. Some of my students want to say what they think and exert their opinions, but there isn't enough time for every student to share. Other students easily get distracted and need physical engagement to stay focused. Through Peer Evaluations, my students can share their thoughts and are pushed to stay focused throughout student discourse.

 
Feedback Systems
One on One Interventions

1:1 interventions take place with students who are far below grade level. Though we try to keep them exposed and practicing grade level content, I need to meet with these students additionally to spiral in remediation support so they can better access the content we learn as a class.

 
Instructional Planning
Basketball Problem

The basketball problem is a built in way to teach the students about rigor. At the beginning of the year, we discussed how math is like an onion.  There are many layers and each one is more complex than the last. The "shot" is an opportunity to reward risk-taking and get the students really thinking about the most high-complexity questions that I can ask. For this reason, students are doubly invested in this part of class. One because they want to challenge themselves, and two because they want to get up there and take the shot. 

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close