Instructional Openings

Collaborative Pre-Reading

My students generate questions before their computer-based blended learning sessions in order to guide their reading of a text through the virtual library, MyOn. They will use these class-generated questions as a reading strategy ("asking questions") in order to increase their comprehension and will give more explicit purpose to their reading. This simple strategy has helped my students be more focused and successful when they're reading independently on My On.

Strategy Resources (2)
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The "Asking WH- Questions" graphic organizer is a place for students to record their who, what, where, when, why, and how questions. These questions can be asked before, during, and after reading. I teach students that the answers to many "WH-" questions can be found in the text.
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
The "Asking WH- Questions" graphic organizer is a place for students to record their who, what, where, when, why, and how questions. These questions can be asked before, during, and after reading. I teach students that the answers to many "WH-" questions can be found in the text.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Collaborative Student Groups
Observation Chart

Observation charts are a type of inquiry chart that stimulate students’ curiosity. They build background information while providing teachers with a diagnostic tool. And they provide opportunities for language support from peers. During an observation chart, I use real pictures or paintings attached to white poster paper or butcher paper that contain a theme (e.g., food from a culture, ways of transportation, games a culture plays, etc.). My students walk around from observation chart to observation chart and write down either a question they're wondering about, a comment they'd like to make, or just an observation (i.e., statement of fact).  

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Color Teams

Color Teams are teams that students form themselves within the rotation groups that I have created. Students usually work in their Color Teams when we conduct a group task. When students are working in their teams, I encourage them to use academic discourse and math vocabulary words. Given that students spend a significant amount of time working independently on digital content in my blended classroom, Color Teams are an important structure to foster productive group work among my students.

 
Stakeholder Collaboration
Data Teams and Blended Instruction

At our blended school, we value data in all forms, whereby we seek to meet both the academic and behavioral needs of our students. In the elementary school setting, where we assess reading levels every six weeks, we also assess student growth and mastery in each student’s blended learning every quarter and assess behavioral trends on a monthly basis.  

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close