Assessment & Data

Kahoot! Quiz

Kahoot! is a collaborative strategy aimed at reinforcing a lesson's core concepts through a fun, game-like atmosphere. It produces instant data, which allows Daniel to use it as a check for understanding. Daniel's students work in groups to answer a question that is projected on the Smart Board. To submit their answers, they use an iPad, which transmits data to the Kahoot! website. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Data
 
 
This is an example of a report that Kahoot! generates after the quiz.
Student Handout
 
 
These are some Kahoot! example questions. Notice the ability to change the wait time for quicker games.
Students In Action
 
 
Student Data
 
 
This is an example of a report that Kahoot! generates after the quiz.
Student Handout
 
 
These are some Kahoot! example questions. Notice the ability to change the wait time for quicker games.
Daniel Utset-Guerrero
Holmes Elementary School
Miami, FL


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
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