Feedback Systems

Tech Thursday

Since my students use several different online platforms to personalize their learning, it is crucial that my students review outcomes and trends in their technology usage. Once a week, the class meets to celebrate achievements by "shouting out" students with high performance and also hold students accountable by "calling out" students who have not spent enough time doing problems correctly. Topics that show lower levels of mastery are reviewed and explained, and upcoming assignments are previewed. This is also the time when I respond to the questions my students have asked via the platforms' messaging systems. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Data
 
 
Here are some example student reports from various content providers that we review on Tech Thursdays.
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is back channel messaging on MangaHigh. This is one way my students can reach out to me get extra support while they're working on digital content.
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Data
 
 
Here are some example student reports from various content providers that we review on Tech Thursdays.
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is back channel messaging on MangaHigh. This is one way my students can reach out to me get extra support while they're working on digital content.
Daniel Utset-Guerrero
Holmes Elementary School
Miami, FL


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Reflective Goal Setting

Part of building a reflective classroom is giving students the space to reflect on all aspects of their learning from their behavior to the resources in the room. Goal setting is a way to teach this expectation, whole group, to students early in the year, and as a way to focus them during it. Each Monday, students write a Goal post it that has some sample questions to guide students. Ultimately, students can select their own topic, and that free range takes time to nurture into SMART goals. Many students write something like "listen in class" but when we discuss on Tuesday and say "Did you reach this goal?" the answer is not measureable. We want our students to see goals as a procedure that can guide their self-driven learning, not as a reaffirmation of the teacher's thoughts or wants for the student. 

 
Assessment & Data
Daily Exit Tickets

I use Daily Exit Tickets to assess mastery of the day's objectives and to make sure students have a clear understanding of how they're doing. Students answer a few targeted questions on a Daily Exit Ticket, and the following day we review mastery shown by each student and celebrate their achievement (please see the "Data Review" strategy video). I read out each student's name who achieved mastery, and we quickly celebrate to recognize their hard work. For the students who have not reached mastery yet, this motivates them to keep striving to get that checkmark on the board. Rather than just using outdated student data from summative assessments, Daily Exit Tickets give me and my students a quick read on how they're growing throughout the week. Though these mini-assessments do not connect to my grading system, they allow me to track my students' daily progress throughout each week.

 
Instructional Planning
Digital Content Connection

Digital Content Connection ensures that students, while engaged in online practice, work on targeted skills that will help them achieve their individual goals. Through various forms of data (Exit Tickets, formative/summative assessments, online learning programs, etc.), I identify the skills that each student needs to practice. I will often group my students into homogenous levels and assign them the same practice. Other times I assign my students individual lessons to meet their needs. Through this process, my students receive practice that is tailored to their needs, allowing them to master a skill before moving on to the next level of content.

 
 
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