Instructional Openings

Goal of the Day

Explicitly stating the Goal of the Day is a deliberate strategy I employ at the beginning of my lessons to ensure that my students understand the purpose (both short- and long-term) of the work we will be doing together. Reviewing the Goal of the Day clarifies for my students the larger meaning behind the smaller and more discrete pieces of learning they do every day. It also helps us all remain focused on my students' larger dreams and aspirations. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is a planning template I use for developing Goals of the Day in kid-friendly language. I also include labels for the Goal of the Day chart that I display in my classroom.
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
Graphic Organizer
 
 
This is a planning template I use for developing Goals of the Day in kid-friendly language. I also include labels for the Goal of the Day chart that I display in my classroom.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
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