Independent Student Learning

Answer Keys

During an Independent Learning Zone session, every student in my blended classroom is working independently on a different set of problems. It's impossible for me to be an answer key for 25 different students doing 25 different problem sets, so I print out their respective answer keys in advance and give each student his or her about 5-10 minutes into the period. This empowers them to monitor their own academic performance and self-correct as they are completing their assigned task. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Don't expect students to know how to use an answer key from a textbook or workbook without guidance. Some answer keys are especially confusing and hard to decipher. I would recommend spending time in the beginning of the year modeling how to use an answer key. In this screencast, I share some tips on how I guide students in using answer keys in my classroom.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Don't expect students to know how to use an answer key from a textbook or workbook without guidance. Some answer keys are especially confusing and hard to decipher. I would recommend spending time in the beginning of the year modeling how to use an answer key. In this screencast, I share some tips on how I guide students in using answer keys in my classroom.
Aaron Kaswell
Middle School 88 Peter Rouget
Brooklyn, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grades:
Sixth grade, Seventh grade, Eighth grade
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