Assessment & Data

Mastery Zone

My blended classroom is based on the Flipped Mastery model (please see the "Introduction to Mastery Based Learning" strategy video). When my students think that they have mastered the skills and concepts in a particular lesson, they show their completed notes to me or my co-teacher and get a Mastery Quiz. Students then head to the Mastery Zone, which is a section of the classroom reserved for students taking Mastery Quizzes and Level Tests. There is no talking in the Mastery Zone and the only technology permitted is a calculator. If they achieve at an 80% or higher rate, students move forward in the curriculum. If not, they review the concepts and materials in the lesson and re-take the Mastery Quiz in the Mastery Zone when they are ready. The Mastery Zone assessment strategy is a concept I adapted from the Algebros Flipped Mastery program.

Strategy Resources (4)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Progress Check-Ins

I have weekly check-in's with students about how they are progressing through the lessons. This ensure face-to-face time with each student and allows me to hold them accountable to the goals they are setting. I ask a standard set of questions "What lesson are you on today?", "What lesson do you plan on being on in a week" ,"Is there anything you need to help you reach your goal?" I record all their answers and keep a running log so I can refer back to these notes each time I conference with a student.

 
Instructional Planning
Daniel's Approach to Planning

Planning is an essential part of a blended teacher’s practice. In blended environments, where students can be at different points in a course on various modalities, blended teachers need to be very intentional about how they plan. Check out the video below to see how Daniel plans for instruction in his blended classroom.

 
Academic Culture
Introduction to Mastery Based Learning

In the traditional classroom, time is constant and understanding is variable from student to student. The Flipped Mastery model inverts the traditional relationship between time and understanding, letting understanding be the constant and time be variable. All of my students are held to the same high standards, but they master standards at a pace they feel comfortable with and are ready for. Initially, many of my students are confused about what a self-paced mastery-based class is all about, so my co-teacher and I find it helpful to introduce the concept to our students in a very strategic and explicit way at the beginning of each school year. 

 
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