Feedback Systems

Teamwork Self-Assessment Rubric

At the conclusion of our team sessions my students self-assess, give feedback/compliments to one another, and agree or share out their disagreements with one another. Our two areas of focus right now are collaboration and accountability. My students score themselves on a scale from 1-4 on these habits and then track their progress daily/weekly in order to consider their next steps or provide feedback to one another. Perhaps most importantly, the sentence stems within the rubric help my students develop a repertoire of conversational skills they will need in the 21st century and beyond.  

Strategy Resources (2)
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
 
Student Handout
 
 
This slide is an example of how students randomly select a number, in this case from a cup with ping pong balls, to randomize, designate, and identify who is responsible for tasks during their team sessions. These numbered and designated roles are used to provide peer-to-peer feedback on how the session went, and what needs to improve.
Freddy Esparza
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Third grade
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This strategy is a small group guided instruction, or in student friendly language, team time with Mr. Esparza. A group of 3-4 students is pulled as other teams are conducting a differentiated math investigation. Students are given a selection of materials to create models and formulate ideas. We work as a collective to identify our misconceptions by asking ourselves questions, explaining why, and checking for understanding. As a scaffold, students use hand signals and our learning goal success rubrics to check themselves for understanding throughout the process.

 
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