Instructional Openings

Role Play Hook

As we move more into content-based learning, the information presented to students can seem very dense at times. A Hook is a simple way to get them excited and give them a sense of what is about to happen in a fun way. The Role Play Hook asks my students to place themselves in others' shoes to get a sense of space and time when they are learning history or science content. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Lesson Plan
 
 
These are some ideas of quick hooks that allow students to role play the beginning of a lesson and therefore become engaged in what they will learn about.
 
Students In Action
 
 
Lesson Plan
 
 
These are some ideas of quick hooks that allow students to role play the beginning of a lesson and therefore become engaged in what they will learn about.
Raul Gonzalez
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
First grade
Similar Strategies
Whole-Group Instruction
Decoding Boards

The decoding boards, which are your basic dry erase boards, help students visually see what their brains do as they read which is looking for blends, digraphs, long/short vowels etc. Rather than simply reading off the board, I have students write the words we practice in phonics and write the diacritical marks that support and show them how to decode words along the way that then support their reading.

 
Academic Culture
Warm Welcomings

Warm Welcomings is a strategy I use to develop a strong positive culture in my blended classroom. When students enter into an inviting atmosphere and begin the class on a positive note, they are able to focus better. It is important to me to start off class together on the rug because my students spend a significant portion of the class working independently on computers and in small groups. Warm Welcomings gives us the time to come together as a community of scholars and it can be anything from a "welcome back from recess" to an invitation for students to share something positive about their time away from class. 

 
Assessment & Data
Teacher v. Student

In Teacher Vs. Students, students compete against the teacher in a quick game of listening and participation. Typically we play this game after a general phonics rule has been taught and students have to practice hearing it for phonological practice. Rather than me just reading a word asking them to identify the sound, I am using the taught rule(s) and turning into a game of friendly competition to show that they are smarter than the teacher. It's important though, to be honest. If I win, I explain what they should practice more of and then try it again another day. 

 
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