Academic Culture

Treasure Map

The Treasure Map is a strategy I use to help my students progress through levels in a self-paced environment without setting deadlines for them. My students record when they start a level and when they end a level. If they complete the level in a given amount of time, they receive a piece of the Treasure Map. When my students complete four levels within the given time, they earn a free A (like contracting for an A). This strategy would also work with other forms of rewards, not just awards linked to a grade or extra credit.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a video that shows how my students use the Treasure Map to help track their progress through the curriculum.
 
Student Data
 
 
This is a picture of the wall visual, along with quest contracts and leaderboards we use to track students' progress. The wall visual is also what we use to visualize who has earned treasure pieces. Some of my students choose to use the wall visual; however, it is not a requirement in our classroom.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a video that shows how my students use the Treasure Map to help track their progress through the curriculum.
Student Data
 
 
This is a picture of the wall visual, along with quest contracts and leaderboards we use to track students' progress. The wall visual is also what we use to visualize who has earned treasure pieces. Some of my students choose to use the wall visual; however, it is not a requirement in our classroom.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Learning Apps
Learning Authentication

I use a variety of tools to help my students authenticate their learning. From blogging to social media and connecting with other classes across the country via Google Hangouts, my students use digital technology to reach learners just like them. To enhance our Genius Hour projects this year, we connnected with classrooms in Toronto. My students shared every aspect of their projects via Edublogs, as well as learned about and critiqued their virtual partners' projects. We also have a class Twitter page where we share our Instagram and Vine posts, as well as Tweets about what is happening in our classroom. To give the world a first-person view of our classroom, we also have a Google Glass blog that students document learning on via video and pictures from Glass.  

 
Learning Apps
Voxer Enables Virtual Collaboration

Voxer is an application I use in my classroom to incorporate verbal collaboration. Voxer is a walkie-talkie type app where teachers can assign students to groups, pose questions, and have students verbally discuss the questions with a virtual audience. When Voxer is being used by students, they are switching between verbal and written communication. Most groups will verbally respond to questions and other students' will type their answers. Voxer is a great application for connecting students virtually with students their own age with limited bandwidth use.

 
Learning Apps
ThingLink for PBL in Science

ThingLink is an online software used to make images interactive. This year, I've used it during a project/problem-based learning (PBL) activity, in which students did a series of tasks to collect data on a soil site of their choice (please see my "Model Overview" to learn about how I use Levels in my classroom). They collected this data and saved it for the final activity, the Soil Report, which asked the students to compile all the information they learned about their soil site and to post it on a ThingLink. This ThingLink was then used to make a target on the larger map of Paracini Ponds (the field site we visited), which was also its own ThingLink. The insight I was looking to gain from the completion of this activity was whether students could take scientific data from a field exercise, analyze it, and make a decision about how the land should be used. 

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close