HS-PS1-8

Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.

 
41 Lesson(s)
   

I See Radiation in the Clouds!

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Students get to experience radiation using dry ice and a cloud chamber.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (23)
 
Reflections (2)
radiation
   

Will All Radioactive Material Harm You?

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

What is a student's perspective about nuclear chemistry and the impact that it can have on humans and the world we live in?

 
Favorites (7)
 
Resources (18)
 
Reflections (2)
radioactive
   

Unit 9 Big Quiz and Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
Rachel Meisner
Chula Vista, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Nuclear processes such as fission, fusion, and radioactive decay involve the release or absorption of energy.

 
Favorites (9)
 
Resources (22)
 
Reflections (1)
a is for atom
   

Exploring Radioactivity

High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
Raymond Stadt
Blue Island, IL
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Radioactive decay is the process by which a nucleus becomes stable.

Standards:
 
Favorites (4)
 
Resources (14)
 
Reflections (1)
band of stability
   

Day 2: Fission and Fusion Comparison

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Modeling is a great tool for students to learn the difference between fission and fusion...however, no two student models are alike!

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
f f project 7 2
   

Are All Isotope Radioactive?

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

The ratio of protons to neutrons is what determines if an isotope is stable or unstable. Isotope notation is a convenient way to represent key information about isotpes

 
Favorites (2)
 
Resources (13)
hydrogen atom
   

Types of Nuclear Decay

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
Rachel Meisner
Chula Vista, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Unstable atoms can decay through alpha, beta, or gamma emission.

Standards:
 
Favorites (7)
 
Resources (17)
 
Reflections (1)
visualizing decay
   

Radioactive Decay and Half-lives

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
Rachel Meisner
Chula Vista, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Radioactive nuclei decay in different amounts of time based on their half-lives.

Standards:
 
Favorites (5)
 
Resources (27)
 
Reflections (1)
marie curie
   

Fission and Fusion Nuclear Reactions

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 10: Nuclear Chemistry and Final Exam Review
Rachel Meisner
Chula Vista, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

During nuclear reactions the nuclei of atoms can change by splitting in fission reactions and combining in fusion reactions.

Standards:
 
Favorites (6)
 
Resources (28)
 
Reflections (1)
modeling fusion
   

Simulated Stimulated Fission

High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
Raymond Stadt
Blue Island, IL
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Fission is a non-spontaneous nuclear process that occurs in unstable, heavy nuclei resulting in more stable daughter atoms.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
phet fission
   

Day 2: Calculating Radioactive Decay

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

After learning about the types of decay, students will practice determining daughter isotopes that are formed during alpha, beta and gamma decay.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (16)
 
Reflections (1)
300 polonium from radon decay
   

Day 1: Comparison Between Fission and Fusion

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Students watch the "Bill Nye: Nuclear Power" video and compare and contrast fission and fusion in a mini-debate..

 
Favorites (2)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
chemical fission fusion energy
   

Fission and Chain Reactions

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Students are introduced to the process of fission by using one of PhET's funniest simulations.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (21)
 
Reflections (2)
nucleur fission
   

Taking a Stand on Nuclear Power?

High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Unit 3-Nuclear Chemistry
Eric Girard
Palos Heights, IL
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

A formal explanation of fission and fusion is provided to accompany the exploration of fission from the previous lesson. Students begin to formulate an opinion of nuclear power

 
Favorites (5)
 
Resources (16)
 
Reflections (1)
susquehanna steam electric station
   

Alpha Decay

High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
High School Chemistry » Unit: Nuclear Chemistry
Raymond Stadt
Blue Island, IL
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Alpha decay is the process by which atoms with too many protons can become stable.

 
Favorites (1)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
alpha
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