students brainstorm local color.MOV - Section 2: The School Colors Are Blue and White, But What's Our Local Color?

 
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What's Your Local Color: Identifying & Understanding Regional Characteristics to Deepen Understanding of Regionalism

Unit 11: Literacy: What's Your (Local) Color? Regionalism in the American Short Story
Lesson 3 of 8

Objective: SWBAT identify and analyze the use of dialect and the structure of a frame story by reading and reflecting upon Mark Twain's "The Notorious Jumping Frog."

Big Idea: B-L-U-E! Blue! W-H-I-T-E! White! Cheering for our local color, both in school and the community as a whole.

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Subject(s):
English / Language Arts, dialect (Literary Terms), Literature, Fictional Literature, independent reading, mark twain, Regionalism, The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, Local Color, frame narrative
  50 minutes
320px jumping frog copy
 
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