Reflection: Developing a Conceptual Understanding 30 Second "Macbeth": Constructing Questions and Predictions--Just Like the Weird Sisters - Section 3: Performing "30-Second Macbeth"

 

I am vehemently opposed to using dumbed-down translations of Shakespeare's works in lieu of teaching a play in Early Modern English. When we use No Fear Shakespeare and its ilk, we are no longer teaching Shakespeare. That's because to teach Shakespeare necessitates Shakespeare's language. Thus, the beauty of the 30-Second Macbeth is that it removes barriers. So what if kids know the ending. They don't know the language until they play with the play's language. Moreover, 30-Second Macbeth leads students to ask questions, as we see later in the lesson. Obviously, a 30 second rendition of the play can't fill in all the gaps in the plot, and kids get this, which is why they ask such wonderful questions. 

  So What if They Know the Ending before Beginning
  Developing a Conceptual Understanding: So What if They Know the Ending before Beginning
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30 Second "Macbeth": Constructing Questions and Predictions--Just Like the Weird Sisters

Unit 8: Oh, Horror! Horror! Horror! "The Tragedy of Macbeth"
Lesson 2 of 13

Objective: SWBAT generate questions and predictions about "Macbeth" after performing the "30 Second Macbeth."

Big Idea: "Two truths are told as happy prologues."

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Subject(s):
English / Language Arts, Classics (Literature), Dramatic Arts, Macbeth, Performance Pedagogy, Folger Shakespeare Library, literarture
  60 minutes
macbeth meets the weird
 
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