Reflection: Student Ownership 'Home-Keeping Youth Have Ever Homely Wits' Act 1.1-1.3 - Section 4: 'Counsel me to fall in love?'

 

The two weeks we spend reading "The Two Gentlemen of Verona" involves very little formal assessment. Instead, I focus on helping the students immerse themselves into the characters' world. To get a sense of what it's like to walk in Valentine or Proteus' shoes. 

Some of my classes will begin to incorporate the sayings of certain characters into the everyday language, some will take on the persona of a character outside of class.  When this happens I know they are fully experiencing the play and they understand it on an analytical level. 

It amazes me that two years later students can remember what a character said or did in one of the plays we read in class, and I think it's because of my experiential approach.  

 The students will get to see a production of the play, at the end of the unit, put on by a traveling troupe of actors based out of Bozeman, MT called Montana Shakespeare in the Schools. This troupe, funded by an NEH grant brings a full performance to our school every year, and after the performance students have an opportunity to interact with the actors in interpretative workshops that further extend their understanding of the play. 

  Reading Shakespeare Aloud
  Student Ownership: Reading Shakespeare Aloud
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'Home-Keeping Youth Have Ever Homely Wits' Act 1.1-1.3

Unit 9: The Two Gentlemen of Verona
Lesson 2 of 11

Objective: SWBAT establish the disorder Shakespeare creates in his plays by identifying the order

Big Idea: Character relationships at the beginnings of plays foreshadow conflicts later on

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Subject(s):
English / Language Arts, character trait, Shakespeare, brainstorming, drama interpretation, dramatic structure, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, dramatic reading, supporting evidence, foreshadowing, interpretation, dramatic literature, uncertainty, rough draft
  55 minutes
valentine and proteus
 
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