Reflection: Checks for Understanding 100 People: An Assessment - Section 3: Grading and Fixing

 

I ask everyone to cross out the ordering standard, which doesn't really apply to this assessment: I can order the value of numbers in scientific notation.

The last standard - I understand how to use a calculator with scientific notation - Only applies to students that asked to use a calculator. If they used a calculator and showed their work, they can get full credit in this standard. They can get full credit in this standard even with the wrong answer. As long as they dealt with each operation correctly, they know how to use a calculator and get the points. If they used a calculator but didn't show most of their thinking, they get a 2. They would get a 1 if their work is completely incorrect or shows none of their thinking. If students did not use a calculator here, I ask them to cross out that standard (since it doesn't apply to them). 

Next I might go to the calculation standard: (I can add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers in scientific notation.) This doesn't apply to students that used a calculator. Students get a 3 if all their calculations are correct (even if their final answer is wrong). They get a 2 if there are some minor errors and a 1 if there are many errors. 

For the word problem standard,I understand how to answer a scientific notation "word problem," our graders need to really reflect on the work they are reading. If a person has all correct calculations but has a final answer that is incorrect, they can not get full credit. I would give a 3 here only if they reached the right answers. they might get a 2 if there are mostly correct steps and a 1 if the steps they used do not approach a reasonable answer. There is debate here and I would circulate to help facilitate conversations. I ask students to discuss what they think they should both give and get here. Students pair and share and can argue their point by explaining their thinking. They know that this grade is simply meant as a reference in their progress and will always have a chance to improve. 

The last standard I would approach might not apply to everyone: I can manipulate numbers to make them easier to work calculate. The question here is, "did they find an easy way to solve the problem?" Here the word "easy" is subjective, but I look for any clever use of the laws of exponents. For example, the first question requires students to find 75% of 7 x 10^9. They could have solved this by doing .75 x 7 x 10^9 with some type of long multiplication algorithm. If they recognized that we could write .75 as 7.5 x 10^-1 and then solved it mentally with 7 x 7.5 = 52.5 and 10^9 x 10^-1 = 10^8, so it could be 52.5 x 10^-8 or 5.25 x 10^8

  Using the Rubric
  Checks for Understanding: Using the Rubric
Loading resource...
 

100 People: An Assessment

Unit 3: Scale of the Universe: Fluency and Applications
Lesson 6 of 22

Objective: SWBAT to reflect on their progress with scientific notation

Big Idea: Students can deepen their understanding of mathematics and track their progress in this unit.

  Print Lesson
1 teacher likes this lesson
Subject(s):
Math, Scalars, scientific notation, scientific notation operations
  60 minutes
100 people resized image
 
1
2
3
Similar Lessons
 
Properties of Exponents (Day 1 of 2)
Algebra I » Polynomials
Big Idea: Students will use Cheerios to visualize 4 important properties of exponents (Product Rule, Quotient Rule, Power to a Power, and Power to a Quotient)
  Favorites(23)
  Resources(18)
Washington, DC
Environment: Urban
Noelani Davis
 
Laws of Exponents - Negative and Zero Powers
8th Grade Math » Exponents and Radicals
Big Idea: Memorization is short term knowledge but understanding endures time.  Create the rules for exponents by expanding the bases to understand.
  Favorites(10)
  Resources(20)
Bowling Green, KY
Environment: Suburban
Christa  Lemily
 
PRE-ALGEBRA: Evaluating Expressions
Algebra I » Functions
Big Idea: Students learn best when they can build their own meaning around content. In this lesson, the students will have a chance to play with numbers while using order of operations to evaluate expressions.
  Favorites(22)
  Resources(19)
Amherst, NY
Environment: Suburban
James Bialasik
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close