Reflection: Student Grouping Writing a Hook for the Introduction - Section 4: Writing Workshop: Hooks

 

Like all my instruction, my Honors students and co-taught students complete the same tasks, they just do it on different days in different ways.

 

For my co-taught classes, I have three teachers--my co-teacher, student teacher, and me.  That means we can break students up in to smaller groups go give more individualize help and instruction. After we broke students in my co-taught classes up, I had five or six students in my group. We did the same thing, with the same questions. 

 

The difference was in the order.  I had all of the students complete the historical context first.  Then we all did the topic's importance first.  We all ended with the hook last.

 

This helps students understand the the concept because you're not jumping from context, importance, hook, context, importance, hook, and so on.  You're going, context, context, context, importance, importance, importance, hook, hook, hook.  For students with processing difficulties, the constant jumping doesn't work.  This does.

 

For co-taught classes, then, I went down the line.

Me: "Topic?"

Student 1:

Me: "Who, what, when, where?"

Student 1:

Me: "That's your historical context. Go."

Then I'd move on to the next student.

Me: "Topic?"

Student 2:

Me: "Who, what, when, where?"

Student 2:

Me: "There's your historical context. Go."

Me: "Topic?"

Student 3:

And on until every student had their historical context. Then I'd repeat the process for historical importance, and again for the hook. They got assistance from their peers as well as from me.

 

 

  Differentiation with Co-teaching
  Student Grouping: Differentiation with Co-teaching
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Writing a Hook for the Introduction

Unit 6: Argumentative Writing and Research with National History Day
Lesson 4 of 8

Objective: Students will be able to clearly introduce their history essay by by writing a hook and describing the historical context.

Big Idea: Introduction, Part 3: Why should I read your essay?

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