Reflection: High Expectations What's My Expression? (Variables Game) - Section 4: Closure

 

I find that it is difficult for quite a few students to reason or think critically.  As a teacher, my goal is to create more lessons that require the students to think.  With Common Core, it has required me to be creative with my lesson design.  My expectations of my students are high, therefore, I want them to strive for higher goals.

In this particular lesson, I wanted the students to write a simple phrase to match an expression.  My requirements were for the students to identify a subject and object in each phrase.  This proved difficult for some of the students because they are not used to thinking.  The students have proved to me that they can evaluate an expression, when given the numbers to use.  But when it comes to "composing" their own problems, then this is difficult.  We will continue working on "composing" problems to give the students more complex tasks.

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  High Expectations: Thinking Lessons
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What's My Expression? (Variables Game)

Unit 5: Patterns & Expressions
Lesson 5 of 5

Objective: SWBAT write phrases that describe particular expressions.

Big Idea: Students use expressions to write phrases that identify the variables and use the correct words to describe the operation.

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