Reflection: Pacing Crashes and Collisions - Section 4: Elaborate

 

I thought it important to mention in this section giving your students time to play with the simulation prior to having them begin any data collection. Sims such as those found at ExploreGizmos and PhET that attract the attention of teachers and students and are a lot of fun to use in the classroom but can be also a distraction as they do have game like qualities to them. Students may play with them more than use them as tools for learning.  

A way around this is to allow students time to play with the sims before digging into the lesson. I make this a practice with my classes at the beginning of the year when were using simulations and I find that as the year progresses they are more attuned to getting right into the simulation and getting into work than having the time to play around with it.

  Time to play with sims
  Pacing: Time to play with sims
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Crashes and Collisions

Unit 7: Movement of Objects in Space & Time
Lesson 11 of 12

Objective: SWBAT use a model to explain conservation of momentum and predict what happens in a collision.

Big Idea: In this lesson, students explore what happens when two objects collide. In particular, they examine what happens to each object after the collision.

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