Reflection: Intervention and Extension Decreasing Arithmetic Sequences - Section 1: Opening

 

Before engaging in today's task, some of my students might need a review and/or some clarification about the differences between recursive and explicit equations. I like to make my own problem for students to look at first, see recursive vs explicit notebook example, and then spiral back to the original dots examples so students can compare and contrast recursive and explicit equations. I find that starting class this way is helpful for students who are struggling. They are able to revisit some past examples and get some clarity about writing different equations. I think this work will help them with today's task.

  Intervention and Extension: Clarifying equations - differences between recursive and explicit equations
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Decreasing Arithmetic Sequences

Unit 6: Arithmetic & Geometric Sequences
Lesson 5 of 10

Objective: SWBAT make connections between tables, graphs, recursive and explicit formulas in relationship to arithmetic sequences. SWBAT compare increasing and decreasing arithmetic sequences.

Big Idea: What if the constant difference in the table is negative? Students explore and compare increasing and decreasing arithmetic sequences.

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Subject(s):
Math, Algebra, Algebra 1, equation, geometric patterns, tables and graphs, arithmetic patterns, function, grade 9, sequences
  60 minutes
gumballs
 
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