Reflection: Diverse Entry Points Arguments for Volume Formulas for Pyramids and Cones - Section 1: Concept Development: Central Tendency

 

With the Common Core and 21st Century Learning has come a validation of multiple ways of approaching problems. This has led me to think, "Should we treat all valid approaches as equal?" I thinking not. Some approaches lead to a correct answer but are not as rich in mathematical value. Such is the case with the problem in this section. A student could, for example, just figure out the total volume of the two prisms and then make an equation to solve for the base area of a prism with the same volume and height of the stacked prisms. The focus of this lesson, though, is on average cross-sectional areas so I will be explicit in telling students that while other approaches may be valid, I am choosing to focus on this particular approach because it illustrates an important math concept that is relevant to this lesson.

  Encouraging Multiple Pathways...Strategically
  Diverse Entry Points: Encouraging Multiple Pathways...Strategically
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Arguments for Volume Formulas for Pyramids and Cones

Unit 11: Measurement and Dimension
Lesson 4 of 6

Objective: SWBAT give an informal argument for the volume formulas for pyramids and cones.

Big Idea: Yogi's smarter than the average bear and a cone's like a cylinder with an average base. After this lesson, students will know what this all means.

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