Reflection: ELL Students Geologic Maps - Patterns Can Tell Us About the Past - Section 1: Introductory Review- What Can We Learn From Geologic Maps?

 

The depth of interesting content in the field of geology is a support, not a hindrance, to language learners.  There is no need for any elementary student to know the names of formations or even the specific types of rocks, unless they are interested in learning them.  That is always a valid reason.  That said, they can develop an awareness that all these names used to describe geologic processes, formations, and events are necessary because they provide the specificity and precision scientists need to make accurate observations and to conduct authentic experiments.  Elementary students, whether they are English language learners or not, can put their toes into improving their specific vocabulary using this content by describing the color or texture of rocks/rock formations they view using terms with a degree of precision appropriate for their stage of language development.  For example, instead of just letting students say that a rock is brown, even beginning language learners can work towards using the more specific terms:  light brown, medium brown or dark brown.  For those who can venture beyond that, you can introduce them to the wealth of words our their used to describe even just the color brown.  A way to remind them of all the shades is to pull out a large crayon box or to refer to the color charts like the ones in Word documents.  

Additional examples of words that can be provided to support them in describing a rock formation are:

rough

smooth

sharp

flat

gradual slope

jumbled slope

rounded

steep slope

striped

broken

distinct colors

dark

jagged

bands of color

bright

one-color

melded colors

muted

loose-looking

lumpy

crystalline

crumbly

shiny

straight-cliffed

 

 

  ELL Students: Supporting Language Development in Content Specific Areas
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Geologic Maps - Patterns Can Tell Us About the Past

Unit 16: End of Year Lessons: Geology and Natural Resources
Lesson 2 of 5

Objective: SWBAT explain how geologic maps of their state that show varied rock formations demonstrate that the landscape has changed over time.

Big Idea: Patterns in rock formations tell a story.

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Standards:
Subject(s):
Science, Geology, natural resources
  65 minutes
calif geology2
 
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