Reflection: Grappling with Complexity Electric Potential Energy - Day 2 - Section 1: Warmup

 

The final part of the warmup is actually quite difficult as students need to make a few intermediate connections before addressing the presented question. First, students need to note that the ball's kinetic energy changes from the initial value of .457 joules to zero when it comes to rest. Then, they need to recognize that that change in energy happens because friction "works on" the ball. Hence, the work done by friction is .457 joules. Furthermore, students need to recognize that they can use their sketch (made in the previous problem) to model a rectangle whose area can be expressed as force times distance, where the distance is the total distance the ball rolls. This then leads to the ability to calculate how far the ball rolls; all in all a bit much for students to infer before settling the question.

  Assigning a Too-Novel Problem
  Grappling with Complexity: Assigning a Too-Novel Problem
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Electric Potential Energy - Day 2

Unit 2: Electrostatics
Lesson 14 of 15

Objective: Students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between work and electric potential energies.

Big Idea: Students, like scientists, need to adjust their models as new information becomes available.

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