Reflection: Rigor Limiting Reactant, Theoretical Yield, and Percent Yield - Section 4: Evaluate

 

After the nuts and bolts activity and notes students tend to understand what a limiting and excess reactant are; however they have lots of difficulty with calculating the limiting reactant in problems. 

  • These problems tend to be difficult mostly because they are very time consuming problems.
  • In the homework example for number 3 students had to determine the limiting reactant and many students got confused and/or didn't want to take the time to do the problem.
  • To help students spend the time to do the problem I give them class time to start the homework so they can get help from their partners and myself which tends to encourage the to stay on task and actually do the problem.

  Difficulty with Limiting Reactant Problems
  Rigor: Difficulty with Limiting Reactant Problems
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Limiting Reactant, Theoretical Yield, and Percent Yield

Unit 4: Unit 5: Stoichiometry, Chemical Reactions, and First Semester Review
Lesson 1 of 7

Objective: Students will be able to distinguish limiting versus excess reactants in a chemical reaction as well as calculate percent yield as demonstrated by doing an activity, taking notes, and performing practice questions.

Big Idea: In chemical reactions a limiting recant causes a reaction to stop, while an excess reactant is leftover. Additionally one can calculate percent yield using the experimental value from performing a lab and the theoretical value from calculations.

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Subject(s):
Science, stoichiometry, Chemical Reactions and Balancing, Chemistry, experimental yield, theoretical yield, percent yield, limiting reactant, excess reactant
  110 minutes
nuts bolts
 
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