Reflection: Lesson Planning Literary Language -Lesson 4 of Cinder Book Three - Section 2: Lesson

 

Today's figurative language assignment is basically the "same" as the one they did in section 2 - in appearance, instructions, etc. I mentioned this in the lesson, but it might seem a little odd.  Why not utilize a new style of practice?

One reason is that I am adding the elements of imagery and allusion to this practice.  I find that since I am "adding", keeping the other practice the same eliminates confusion for my students.

I have also learned that familiar is sometimes best especially when students did well with it the first time. My students did well with this in section two - including the "teaching" aspect.  So, I want to build on that instead of pulling the rug out from under them.

That does not mean I will always use the same or similar assignment every time we practice a skill.  It does mean that as the teacher in the classroom, I need to "know" my students well enough to know what they need.

  Why use the same assignment?
  Lesson Planning: Why use the same assignment?
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Literary Language -Lesson 4 of Cinder Book Three

Unit 4: Literary Reading - "Sooner or later, everything old is new again." Part 3
Lesson 4 of 6

Objective: SWBAT correctly identify examples of figurative language taken from the class text.

Big Idea: "If at first you don't succeed..."

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Standards:
Subject(s):
English / Language Arts, Literature, Literary Language
  55 minutes
practice makes progress
 
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