The Development of a Declaration: Diction, Syntax and Rhetoric in the Age of Revolutions (Day 1 of 2)

Unit 8: Literary: Analysis of Plot and Character Development in A Tale of Two Cities
Lesson 6 of 11

Objective: SWBAT analyze seminal U.S. documents for craft and structure by reading and completing analytical annotations for one of three revolutionary declarations.

Big Idea: Revolutions are cyclical in nature--and they all share similar ideas, documents and strategies. At the risk of starting our own revolution, helping students to create their own declaration is one way to dive into this historical concept.

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