Lesson: Metaphors and Similes

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Lesson Objective

Students will be able to distinguish between metaphors and similes. They will also explain the meaning of metaphors and similes in poems.

Lesson Plan

Connection (3-5 mins): Students should be seated on the carpet with a partner.  They will be expected to turn and talk to this partner throughout the lesson.  Over the past two days we have learned about two different types of figurative language, similes and metaphors.  You did a great job finding examples of both of these types of figurative language in poetry.  Today, we will put together what we have learned to determine the meaning of both metaphors and similes in poetry.

Teach/Active Engagement (10-12 mins):  Can someone remind me the definition of metaphors?  Students should respond a metaphor is a comparison between two things. Turn and tell your partner an example of a metaphor you have read lately or heard before.  Students should turn and talk.  Teacher allows a few partnerships to share out their responses.  Those were all great examples of metaphors.  Remember, a simile is also a comparison between two things but similes use the words “like’ or “as”.  Turn and tell your partner an example of a simile.  Students should turn and talk.  Teacher calls on some students to share out their responses.

It is important to remember that poets use figurative language to help us create images in our mind as we read.  Watch me as I read a poem paying close attention to the metaphors and similes as I create pictures in my mind.  Teacher places the poem, Butterflies on the overhead (poem typed below). 

Butterflies are as light as feathers
They a paper bags floating in the air
And are as beautiful as dancing spirits
I think they are small stars in the sky.
Sometimes they are as blue as tear drops
I bet they love flowers swaying in the breeze
Butterflies are so cool!

Teacher reads aloud the first two lines of the poem.  As I was reading those two lines, I noticed both a metaphor and simile.  The first line, butterflies are as light as feathers, is an example of a simile.  The author is comparing the butterfly to a feather.  I can see in my head a feather floating in the breeze, this helps me image a light butterfly floating in the air as well.

The second sentence is an example of a metaphor.  Once again the author is comparing the butterfly to something that is light floating on the air, but this time a paper bag.  This creates a very different image in my head.  The feather is very peaceful while the paper bag makes me thing of litter or trash blowing in the wind. Did you notice, how with each of the examples I stopped to determine if the line was a metaphor or simile then created a mental image of the comparison. 

Now it’s your turn to try.  Teacher reads aloud the next two lines of the poem.  Turn and tell your partner which metaphors or similes are present in those lines.  Students turn and talk.  Teacher calls on students to share out responses.  Students should respond that line 3 is an example of a simile and line 4 is an example of a metaphor.  Now turn and tell your partner these two comparisons create in your mind.  Students should turn and talk.  Teacher calls on a few students to share out their responses.  Each of you created very good mental images of the author’s words.  I am impressed with the different ways you interpreted the text.  Remember each time we read a poem, we must pay close attention to the metaphors and similes to create mental images. 

Independent Reading (15-20 mins): Students return to their seats.  During workshop time today you will complete a worksheet.  This is the last day we will work with metaphors and similes, so we need to make sure everyone has a clear understanding of both examples of figurative language.  If you finish early, you may read from your poetry packets. 

Exit Slip/Share (3-5 mins): Students should complete the metaphor and simile worksheet.  These worksheets will be collected at the end of workshop time.  This worksheet can be used as an assessment to determine which students will need remediation later in the unit.

Reflection: This is the final lesson focused on figurative language.  I used the poem butterflies, because it features both metaphors and similes.  The worksheet that serves as the exit slip is a great assessment to determine which students mastered the skill.  A fourth lesson could be incorporated if students overall did not do well on the assessment.

Lesson Resources

Simile Assessment   Assessment
14,307
Metaphor Assessment    Assessment
12,276

Comments

V KAFFENBERGER Posted one year ago:

straightforward and user-friendly!! 

Sarah Johnson Posted one year ago:
Amber, Why aren't the Common Core Standards attached to your lessons anymore? I loved that when I did some planning over the summer! Sarah

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