Lesson: Reading Comp: Figurative Language 4

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Lesson Objective

Teaching Point: Readers identify the words that show the meaning and purpose of figurative language in a passage.

Lesson Plan

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Day 4:

Big Ideas:

  • Individual words can help support your inferences about the meaning of figurative language and sensory details.

 

Standards:

 

  • Identify the meaning and effect of figurative language, including comparisons.  [ELA.12b-iii.5]

 

  • Identify figurative language and infer why figurative language is used.  [ELA.12b-i.5]

 

  • Define similes and metaphors and identify them as ways of comparing.   [ELA.12b-ii.5]

Make inferences based on sensory details.  [ELA.12a.5]

Teaching Point:

 

Readers identify the words that show the meaning and purpose of figurative language in a passage.

Materials:

Student copies of the entire locomotion text.

 

 

Lesson part 1:

  • Readers, we have spent the last for days identifying figurative language in texts. As we have seen, figuring out the meaning of figurative language can be tricky, but there are ways to figure out what it means. For example, you can identify specific words in the sentence or paragraph that show the meaning and purpose of figurative language in a passage.
  • Today we are going to begin reading a book that I recently discovered. Once I picked it up, I couldn’t put it down! This story is told through a series of poems written by a young boy named Lonnie. Lonnie has had to endure some very traumatizing events, and is learning to deal with those events through poems. Let’s read the first poems, “Poem Book” (page 1) and “Roof” (page 2) together. First, we will read to figure out what this young boy is dealing with [his parents have died because he compares them to stars in the sky so he must think they are in heaven]. Then we will read it to identify and mark the figurative language. Finally, we will read it and think about how specific words in the passage can help us figure out the meaning of the figurative language we find.
  • In line 13, Lonni says, “But when Miss Edna’s voice comes on, the ideas in my head go out like a candle and all you see left is this little string of smoke that disappears real quick…” What does this mean? [Miss Edna’s voice makes him lose his creativity? What other words in the passage helped you figure this out [Ms. Edna keeps telling him to be quiet, so she must have beaten the creativity out of him].
  • Scholars, although the simile “out like a candle” was easy to identify, the meaning of the phrase wasn’t as simple. We were able to figure out the meaning by thinking about other helpful words in the sentence.
  • The big idea of this unit is that individual words can help support your inferences about the meaning of figurative language and sensory details. Just like we used individual words as context clues in the last unit, we will be using exact words to help us understand the meaning of figurative language. The best strategy we can use when we are confused, whether it be by a single word or by a longer, figurative phrase, is to use other words in the passage as a guide.

 

Lesson part 2:

  • Scholars, now that we know the purpose of the unit, we will read a few more poems to put the aforementioned skill to practice. The next poem we are going to read, “Memory,” doesn’t have any figurative language. However, Lonnie tells you about another important person in his life. We aren’t going to read all of the poems in this book, but there are certain poems we must read in order to understand future ones we will read.
  • Read “Memory”(page 5) so students become familiar with his little sister, Lilly.
  • Read “Mama” (page 7) so students can really understand just how much his mother meant to him and how much she misses him.

 

Lesson part 3:

  • Scholars, now that we have read a few more poems to better understand the important people in Lonnie’s life, we will read one more so we can practice the skill of using other words in a passage to help us understand the meaning of figurative language.
  • Read “Group Home Before Miss Edna’s House. ” (page 15).
    • In this poem, Lonnie is comparing monsters to someone or something, but it doesn’t come clear until the middle-to-end that the monsters are the other boys in the group home. Words that help us figure this out are:
      • Regular boys (line5)
      • Snatch (line 8)
      • take (line 9)
      • steal (line 11)
      • throwaway boys/us
      • Scholars, it wasn’t clear who the monsters were until we thought carefully about the other words in the passage. Whenever you come across a complicated simile or metaphor, be sure to look for other words in the passage that help you understand the figurative language
 

Readers identify the words that show the meaning and purpose of figurative language in a passage.

 

 

 

Reading Response

What have you learned about Lonnie by reading the first few poem? Give evidence to support your answer.

Lesson Resources

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