Lesson: Character Traits 9

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Lesson Objective

Point: All subjects have traits. Readers can determine a subject’s traits by noticing how they respond to events and by noticing the big actions they take.

Lesson Plan

Text: Yours For Justice, Ida B. Wells

Point: All subjects have traits.  Readers can determine a subject’s traits by noticing how they respond to events and by noticing the big actions they take.

Link:  Scholars, we have been noticing cause and effect in biographies.  We learned that we have to know why our subject takes a big action.  Usually the author tells us why.  Yesterday, though, we learned that sometimes we need to infer.  Today I am going to teach you that subjects have traits.  Readers can determine a subject’s traits by noticing how they respond to events and the big actions they take.

 

Teaching: Today we are going to return to Ida B. Wells.  Although we are less that halfway through this book, we probably already know some of Ida’s traits.  For example, yesterday we learned that she didn’t move to the car for black people when the conductor asked her to.  A passive or weak person would have just followed directions.  But Ida would not be bullied.  Ida was a passionate person.  She strongly believed that all people should have the same rights.  As we read today, let’s see if we find other evidence that Ida is a passionate person, or whether we can think of another trait for her.

  • Read the next event (hiring a lawyer):. Scholars, on this page Ida took a big action.  She hired a lawyer to fight for her rights.  Why did she do this?  (tells you in the text).  I think this is more evidence to prove that she is a passionate, devoted person.  She cares a lot about equality, and she wasn’t afraid to fight for it.
  • Read the next page:  Scholars, on this page, I see even more evidence that Ida is a passionate person.  Passive or weak people wouldn’t care if their dreams were crushed.  In fact, they might not even have big dreams.  But Ida hat a big dream and she’s disappointed and heartbroken that things aren’t going well right now.

Active Engagement:  Scholars, I am going to keep reading.  The next time Ida takes a big action, we are going to see if we learn anything more about her traits.  (There are papers for them to jot, or just do T&T)

  • Read the next page:  On this page Ida took another big action.  She wrote an article about her court case against the railroad.  (Have them find more evidence.  If they want to add other words, brave, motivated, whatever, that’s fine).
  • Read the next page (she continues to write and attend conventions):  Nothing, or more evidence that she is involved.
  • Read the next page (she persuades people to buy her paper):  On this page Ida took a big action (Call on someone to say that Ida rode the trains talking about her paper and that she and her business partner made the paper more distinctive)  What do these actions say about her traits (more on being motivated), perhaps creative?
  • Finish the next page.

Link:  Scholars, our subjects have traits.  We can figure out their traits by noticing the actions they take and their responses to events.   As you read your biography today, see if you can determine your subject’s traits and more importantly, make sure you jot down your evidence.

Share: Trait Organizer

 

 

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