Lesson: Combining Sentences Using Appositives

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Lesson Objective

SWBAT identify and combine sentences using appositives with 80% accuracy by the end of the week as shown by a teacher created grammar assessment.

Lesson Plan

Identifying Appositives and Combining Sentences
 
 
LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE
LESSON PLAN
Standard : WC 1.1
 
 
 
5WC1.1 Sentence Structure: Identify and correctly use prepositional phrases, appositives, and independent and dependent clauses; use transitions and conjunctions to connect ideas.
I. Desired Outcome
SWBAT identify and combine sentences using appositives with 80% accuracy by the end of the week as shown by a teacher created grammar assessment. 
II. Evidence of Learning*
-Thumbs up/Thumbs Down
-Ss Grammar tickets
-Friday quiz
 
 
III. Opening the Lesson
A. Activity to open the lesson ideally:
 1. Motivates and engages students,
 2. Either assesses prior knowledge or explicitly builds on prior knowledge/life experiences/interests – for example, “Do Nowsâ€
 3. States the objective of the lesson.
B. How long will the opening take?
C. Consider Blooms Taxonomy/Ask good questions (Knowledge, Understanding, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation)
Day 1
 
Tell Ss that this week we will continue what we learned about identifying appositives last year to start combining sentences on our own. Remind Ss that an appositive is a noun or noun phrase that tells more about another noun in a sentence. Remind students that appositives usually are set-off by commas. You may want to practice finding some appositives in the spelling paragraph for the week, or you can use the following examples. 
 
         Los Angeles, the largest city in California, is home to the LA Dodgers. 
 
Gertrude, my old friend from the gipsy boarding house, and I went to dinner last night
 
Dr. Beverly Rodriguez, a smart and friendly person, ate apple pie with James.
 
Ask for a student volunteer to come up and underline the appositive. Have classmates judge whether or not the student found the appositive. Circle the noun appositive tells more about. 
 
Ask Students: 5th graders, what do you notice about the appositive in both these sentences? What sort of pattern do you notice? 
 
Answer: they tell more about a noun that they directly follow, no verb included, they are set off by at least one comma. 
 
Tell Ss today we will be practicing combining two sentences using an appositive. 
 
Write the pair of sentences on the board and model figuring out how to fit them together. 
Neil Armstrong was born in Ohio. He was the first man on the moon.
Your thinking may sound like this: Well, I see two sentences. I know I need to put them together. I know that an appositive always goes after a noun. How many nouns are in my first sentence? Two. Okay, which one is the second sentence about? Neil Armstrong, right. Okay, I know that I put a period after the noun, then add the appositive. And I know I shouldn’t include the verb so I’ll get rid of the “was.â€Â There we go, Neil Armstrong, the first man on the moon, was born in Ohio. Perfect!
 
Repeat as needed with remaining sentences. Ask Ss to follow your process for adding the appositive, namely:
 
1)   Circle all the nouns in the first sentence
2)   Figure out which one the second sentence gives you more information about
3)   Insert your comma and add the appositive. Don’t include the verb. 
4)   Add another comma at the end if it isn’t the end of the sentence. 
 
(3-4 Minutes)
 
 
 
IV. Instruction and Modeling* – What is the teacher doing?
A.What are you going to teach and how? (Will you provide relevant information, model thought processes, establish guides or graphic organizers, etcetera?)
B.How will you differentiate instruction? (small groups, guided math, guided reading, guided writing, literature circles, etc)
C..How long will each activity take?
D. Consider Blooms Taxonomy/Ask good questions (Knowledge, Understanding, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation)
E. Consider Newmann’s Rigor
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parallel
 
Day 2
 
Remind Ss how yesterday we practiced combining two sentences using an appositive. Tell Ss that today we be using this same skill, just in a different way. Tell students that yesterday we learned one way to combine two sentences using an appositive. Use the Gertrude example from yesterday. 
 
Last night I went to dinner with Gertrude. She is my friend from the gypsy boarding house. 
Combine the classic way, as in
 
Gertrude, my friend from the gipsy boarding house, and I went to dinner last night
 
Tell Ss that there is another way to combine these two sentences using an appositive and that today we will be practicing this new skill. Tell students that sometimes the appositive comes at the end of a sentence instead of in the middle. Model combining the sentences like
 
Last night I went to dinner with Gertrude, my old friend from the gypsy boarding house. 
 
Show students how the appositive now comes at the end of the sentence. 
 
Ask: Besides being at the end of the sentence, what do you notice is different about this sentence? Hint: take a look at the punctuation.  
 
Have students read the two sentences and talk to a partner, then discuss whole class. The biggest difference should be that only one comma is set-off the appositive and the syntax of the original sentence has been changed slightly. 
 
 (10 minutes)
 
V.Guided Practice – What are the students doing?
A.What will students do to interact and practice the subject matter? 
B. How will you differentiate instruction? 
C.What sorts of groupings will you use?
D.How long will each activity take?
Practice combining sentences in this manner for a little while until students get the hang of it. Make sure to emphasize that they may need to change the word order in order for the sentence to make sense. 
 
 
(3-5 minutes)
 
VI. Independent Practice –
Ss complete their worksheet each day, the last two questions of each to be used as an exit ticket.    
 (10 minutes)
VIII. Closing the Lesson
 
       
At the end of each, ask Ss to turn and tell a partner two clues they can use in a sentence to make sure they are identifying or forming an appositive correctly. 
 
Answer: there is a noun followed by a comma. The phrase after the comma gives more information about the noun. 
(5-8  Minutes)
 
 
 
 
1. What went well?
2. What would you change?
3. What needs explanation?
With simple declarative sentences like this, students felt successful at adding appositives based on the patterns modeled as a class. Ss were also generally able to identify the appositive with ease (using the commas as a clue). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 I would monkey with the sentence structures so that students were being presented with different styles of sentences to combine…doing so would hopefully make students a little bit more elastic in their understanding of the different ways you can use an appositive to combine sentences. 
Exactly what information needs to be taken out of the sentence or information you are turning into an appositive. Many students were still including articles in their new, combined sentences, for example…
 
Neil Armstrong, he was a famous astronaut, landed on the moon. 
 
 

Lesson Resources

Appositive Practice Day 1 and Day 2 Worksheet   Classwork
32
Combining Sentences using Appositives 7 Step   Other
3
Combining Sentences using Appositives 7 Step   Other
2
Appositive Practice Day 1 and Day 2 Worksheet   Classwork
4
More Practice Appositive Identification and C   Classwork
2

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