Lesson: Run On Sentences

Susan Fields Epiphany School, Ma Dorchester Center, MA
2557 Views
65 Downloads
3 Favorites

Lesson Objective

SWBAT define run-on sentence; distinguish between complete sentences and run-on sentences; correct a run on sentence in two ways.

Lesson Plan

Opening:

Present students with the following:

 

I went to the store I saw my friend Casey.

 

Ask students, “What do you notice about this sentence?”  Hopefully students will articulate that it doesn’t have enough punctuation or that it’s 2 sentences smooshed together.  Teacher says, “Yes, your observations are correct.  We call this a run on sentence. Today we’re going to learn about how to identify run on sentences and 2 ways to fix them.”

 

Introduction to New Material 1:

 

           Students take notes on the following, filling in the blanks where needed.

“A run on sentence is when 2 sentences are illegally put together as one.  When I say ‘illegally,’ I mean that the Grammar Gods do not allow it to happen.  For example, the Grammar Gods do not allow one comma to separate 2 sentences.  I could not have written:

 

I went to the store, I saw my friend Casey.

 

          A comma is NOT STRONG enough to separate 2 sentences.  A COMMA and a CONJUNCTION is okay, but not just a comma.  [Teacher may take the chance to review all the conjunctions.  I use FANBOYS as a way to remember them all: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so.]

 

Guided Practice 1/Independent Practice 1:       

        First, let’s see if we can distinguish between a sentence and a run-on.  Then let’s work on exploring ways to fix run-on sentences. 

       Teacher models the first few, asking herself if 2 sentences are illegally smooshed together.  The students write “R” if it’s a run-on and “S” if it’s a sentence. Students independently complete the rest.

 

Introduction to New Material 2:

          Okay, so there are 2 ways to fix a run-on.  Let’s go back to our first example.  Can anyone tell me one way to fix it?

 

I went to the store I saw my friend Casey.

 

“Yes, we could separate it into 2 sentences.  We’ll put the period after store and fortunately the ‘I’ is already capitalized.” It would read:

 

          I went to the store. I saw my friend Casey.

 

“How else could we fix it?  Yes, we could add a COMMA and CONJUNCTION. It would read:

 

         I went to the store, and I saw my friend Casey.

 

Guided Practice 2/Independent Practice 2:

        Teacher models the first few, asking herself if separating into 2 sentences or adding comma/conjunction would flow better.  Then the teacher rewrites the sentence in the best way.  Students independently complete the rest.

Lesson Resources

No resources at this time.

Comments


Cancel
No comments at this time.
Add Comment

Close

Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close