Lesson: Elements of plot #1

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Lesson Objective

SWBAT: Identify elements of plot (exposition and rising action)

Lesson Plan

DO NOW

 

Ask students to list and define all the elements of plot in their own words and put them in correct order.

Go over and discuss do now. (10 mins including discussion)

**Students were provided teacher definitions for exposition, rising action, falling action, climax, and resolution during a previous lesson  

 

 Teaching Point

 

-Identifying exposition and rising action in a text

 

Mini Lesson (15 mins including active engagement)

**Before starting lesson distribute copies of text and have students draw a plot diagram in their reader's notebook

 

1.Teacher will use text as a guided reading ("The Most Dangerous Game")

2. As teacher reads (First 5-7 paragraphs) ask students to identify exposition and 2 examples of rising action and record on their plot diagram

 

Active engagement

1. Ask students to turn and talk to their neighbor and compare their responses

2. After sharing 2-3 student responses the teacher wraps up mini lesson and releases students for working independently

 

Independent Work (45 mins)

1. Students will practice identifying the exposition and 3 examples of rising action from their independent reading book and record in reader's notebook 

***During this time teacher may pull individual students in a small group or one on one to provide extra support to the lesson. Also, teacher could circle room and provide students with support. 

Note: It's important to establish expectations for independent work time. My students have been taught that this is silent time and you focus on working. The first two weeks of the school year were set aside to focus on just class routines and expectations. (see reflection) Depending on your students and grade level you may want to provide a break. e.g 4th - 6th graders in my building are not alloted as much time for independent work. 

 

Exit Slip - Picture Story Map (15 mins)

Introduce picture story map to students (transparency). Explain to students that a good way to recall the exposition and rising action are through pictures. Tell students they should complete only the first two boxes which are the boxes for exposition (1) and rising action (2).

 

Homework

1. Reading logs and stop and jots (who? what? where? why? How?)

 

MATERIALS

Copies of the short story "The Most Dangerous Game"

Copies of Picture Map (transparency)

Reader's notebook

Overhead projector

  

1. What went well?

The pacing of class went really well. Having students record plot diagrams and later drawing picture story maps were really powerful. Students can always go back and reference if need be because things are recored in their reader's notebooks.The opportunity for students to share the do now and move and talk during the active engagment part of the lesson is good b/c they don't get restless when it's time for independent practice. Part of the success for this lesson was the opportunity for students to be engaged at every moment of the lesson (discussion during do now, writing during mini lesson, discussion during active engagement, drawing aspect for exit slip).

 

2. What would you change?

 

I would probaly change the do now. Students completed the do now fairly quickly and for me that's not good b/c that is a time when I walk around and check homework. Also, I would assure next time that my students had appropriate fictional books. Some students were reading nonfiction books which didn't work out well.

 

3. What needs explanation?

 

It's to the teacher's advantage to explain to students they should be reading fictional books for this unit for class and a book that's on their reading level. Assess students ahead of time to know their independent reading levels and show them how to choose "the right" book for themselves. Also, the expectations for mini lesson (see mine below) and expectations for independent work time. These are important because it will allow you to maximize instructional time. Lastly, the types of questions that students should jot down on post it notes for homework needs to be clear for students.

 

Lesson Resources

http://www.classicshorts.com/stories/danger.html
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PICTURE STORY MAP  
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