Lesson: Lesson 2: Abolitionist Leaders of the 1800s

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Lesson Objective

By the end of the lesson, SWBAT to explain the beliefs of abolitionists in the U.S. before the Civil War. By the end of the lesson, SWBAT to identify and explain the roles of famous abolitionists such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth, John Brown, and Frederick Douglas

Lesson Plan

Key Points:

·       An abolitionist is someone who joined the movement to abolish, or end, slavery.

·       Major abolitionists were John Brown, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Sojourner Truth, and Abraham Lincoln

·       Abolitionists were mainly located in the North.


Vocabulary:

·       Slavery, Abolitionists, North, South, Rural, Urban, Plantation, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Sojourner Truth, Abraham Lincoln, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, John Brown


Essential Question:

·          How did the differences between the North and South create conflict and war between the two regions?


Assessment:

At the end of the lesson, Ss will write a persuasive letter from the point of view of an abolitionist trying to convince slave owners to set their slaves free.  In addition, students will take a brief quiz in the form of an exit ticket to see how well they understand the objective.


Standard:

(Georgia) SS5H1 The student will explain the causes, major events, and consequences of the

Civil War.


Opening:

Teacher:

·       Teacher will put the following sentence on the board to get students thinking: “What does freedom mean to you?”

·       T will ask the Ss to write their responses down on a piece of paper

·       T will ask the Ss to work quietly.

·       T will tell the Ss to share their responses with the class.

·       T will then preview the lesson by explaining that in today’s lesson we are going to learn about the abolitionist movement that formed in the United States.

·       T will pull out the KWL chart that was used in the last lesson on the differences between the North and South and have students add things they want to learn about abolitionists on the K side of the chart.

Students:

·       Students will sit down at their appropriate seats

·       Students will work through the sponge independently

·       Students will call out there answers. 

Materials:

KWL Chart, Paper Pencil


 Introduction to New Material (20 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will explain even though there was slavery in the South in the mid 1800’s, there were people in the North and even in the South that were against slavery.

·       T will show a brief PowerPoint on the birth and execution of the abolitionist movement.

·       T will start the PowerPoint by explaining the conditions of slavery and how that led to the abolitionist movement.

·       T will emphasize the major events (Raid of Harper’s Ferry) /books (Uncle Tom’s Cabin)/people (Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth) of the abolitionist movement.

·       T will emphasize that the works of these abolitionists influenced many people in the U.S.

·       T will explain that in the North, where slavery was outlawed (because of the factories etc.), abolitionists were very prevalent.

·       T will also explain that the huge popularity of the abolitionist movement motivated and inspired Abraham Lincoln.

·       T will explain that in the South, however, abolitionists and the movement itself made people very nervous and angry – created this huge divide between the North and South

·       T will ask the Ss to fill out their graphic organizers that correspond to the PowerPoint.

·       After the movie, T will show a clip of a video about the Abolitionist movement.

·       T will quiz the students about the movie after watch the short segment.

Students:

·       Students will pay attention to the Power Point presentation

·       Students will ask any questions concerning the different abolitionists.

·       Students will fill out their graphic organizers. 

·       Students will watch the video clip about the abolitionist movement.

·       Students will ask and answer questions about the video clip.

Materials:

LCD (Technology infusion), graphic organizer, video clip


Guided Practice (10 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will tell the Ss that they are going to write a letter from the point of view of an abolitionist to a person that owns slaves.

·       T will ask the Ss to write a persuasive letter trying to convince that person to let their slaves go.

·       T will pull out a piece of chart paper with the heading “Ways to convince a slave owner to give up their slaves.”

·       T will ask the Ss to think of things that they should say to a slave owner about why they should give up their slaves, ie: it is immoral, humans should be paid for work, slavery splits families up, slavery takes away people’s freedom, slavery prevents people from getting an education, etc.

·       T will write down the ideas on the chart paper.

·       T will ask the Ss what is essential in a persuasive writing piece: (it has good arguments, it is convincing, etc.)

·       T will also emphasize that when writing a persuasive piece of writing it is best to write in a courteous tone in order to gain their respect and attention.

·       T will have the students also fill out what they learned for the day on the L portion of the KWL chart.

Students:

·       Students will come up things to add to the list.

·       Students will attempt to put themselves in the position of the abolitionists.

·       Students will fill out their KWL chart.

·       Students ask questions.

Materials:

Chart Paper, KWL Chart


Independent Practice (40 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will tell the Ss that now they are going to create a letter of their own using their own ideas and the ideas on the chart paper.

·       T will hand out the template that starts with the greeting “Dear Southern Slave Owner,”

·       T will monitor the room making sure that the Ss are writing their letter quietly and diligently.

·       T will work with 2-3 struggling students and write a group letter. 

·       T will have early finishers go to the following websites (http://americancivilwar.com/women/hbs.html, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1561.html, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1539.html, http://www.sojournertruth.org/, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1550.html) or one they find themselves and create a fact book from the template provided on of the abolitionists we discussed in class. (Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Brown, Frederick Douglas, Sojourner Truth, William Lloyd Garrison).

Students:

·       Ss will fill write the letter.

·       Ss will ask questions when they have them.

·       Ss will ask for help if needed.

Materials:

letters, chart paper, fact book template


 Closing (10 minutes):

Teacher:

·       As a closing, T will ask some Ss to read part of their letters.

·       T will review what the term abolitionist means.

·       T will review some of the major abolitionists.

·       T will review the key points with the students.

·       T will hand the students an exit ticket that will briefly assess whether they internalized and accomplished the day’s objectives.

·       T will ask the students if they have any last minute questions.

·       T will explain the Homework – Students will create a fact book about one of the abolitionist leaders that we discussed during class.

·       T will go over the rubric with the students.

Student:

·       Students will share out their letters.

·       Students will jot down their answers for the exit ticket.

Materials:

letters, exit ticket


Homework:

Abolitionist Fact Book


Teacher's Reflection
Overall, from what I noticed, the objective of this lesson was accomplished fairly easily. I found that students can relate to the idea that slavery is bad and therefore they understand why people were abolitionists. At the beginning of the lesson, I found it very important to review the geographic and cultural differences between the North and South. This really laid the ground work for why the South had slaves and thus hardly any abolitionists, and why the North was the heart of the abolitionist movement. In addition, during the lesson, I found it particularly beneficial as a means of checking understanding and a drill in higher order thinking, to have the students anticipate why people were against slavery. During the letter writing portion of the lesson, I found that while students definitely took a tone that was against slavery, they did not always put that much substance into their writings. Therefore, when I did the lesson the second year, I made sure to really emphasize that the writing should not be hostile, and should be full of convincing reasons beyond the trite line, "slavery is bad." Finally, when explaining the homework (fact book), I found it useful to really discuss the difference between a fact of substance and a weak fact. 

Lesson Resources

Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Letter Template   Activity
1,271
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - PowerPoint   Smart Board
1,846
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Key Note   Smart Board
578
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Movie    Other
1,581
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Exit Ticket   Assessment
1,090
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Fact Book (PC)  
1,072
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Fact Book (Mac)   Activity
503
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Lesson Plan   Lesson Plan
1,704
Civil War Unit - Lesson 2 - Abolitionist Movement - Graphic Organizer  
1,387

Comments

Jessica King Posted one year ago:

YOU ARE AMAZING AND SAVED MY WEEK!!!!!!!!!


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