Lesson: Demeter Persephone Part I

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Lesson Objective

Students analyze interactions between characters Students determine characters’ traits Students analyze the way in which this myth is related to the themes and issues of its historical period

Lesson Plan

 Lesson Name: Demeter and Persephone I            Course: High School Language Arts by Anke al-Bataineh


Objective:   
Students analyze interactions between characters

Students determine characters’ traits

Students analyze the way in which this myth is related to the themes and issues of its historical period


Essential Questions:            (write on board)
What is the myth of Demeter and Persephone about? What purpose does it serve?

How can we learn about the personalities of characters in a story?

What were the important beliefs and problems of the Ancient Greeks?


Materials:           
Demeter and Persephone: Spring Held Hostage

Compare/contrast Zeus, Hades

Compare/contrast mortal, immortal mothers

Question Packet

Anticipatory Set:         (5 min)
Ask students to recall, from memory or the mind map, what they know about the following characters in Greek mythology:

Zeus, Hades, Demeter, Persephone

Ask students what reasons there are for creating and remembering myths in a society.

Input:         (5 min)
Remind students that myths serve to explain natural phenomena. Tell them that we will read the myth of Demeter and Persephone in comic book version today and tomorrow. They will need to answer all 4 types of QAR questions with appropriate answers, and there will be additional questions asked as they read.

Guided Practice:         (10 min)
Read the instructions on the front of the packet with the class. Clarify as needed. Lead students through the Pre-Reading questions and the maps in the comic book. Model answers while referring to the QAR categories again.

 

Group Work:         (25 min)

Assign students pairs. Students may divide up labor of reading and/or answering questions however they wish, although it is not acceptable for one person to listen and not follow along in the book. They may structure their time as they wish, whether they stop at each question or at each stop sign. They should not, however, read past a page before answering its questions in the packet, since some are predictive or based on limited information.

The book is very easy to understand, but monitor that students are not rushing. They need to take in the pictures as well as the words. Monitor lower readers for correct sequencing of dialogue, as they may not be used to non-linear reading and may become confused.

 

Discussion:                  (15 min- 25 min)

After 20 minutes, stop groups where they are. Ask if any type of question is more difficult for them to answer than other types. If most students are struggling in the same area, model how to find answers in that area. Engage the group in a discussion of the characteristics asked about in questions 5, 6, 10. Lead students in reviewing evidence in the text and pictures and figuring out what this means about the characters’ personalities.

 

Define this process as characterization. Ask students why authors or story-tellers might explain characters in this indirect way, instead of just telling us all about their personality upfront. Entertain as much speculation as possible. If students struggle, apply the question to a familiar movie, such as Inception or Twilight. Bring students back to listing the indirect ways an author or story-telling can characterize a character. Then, have students complete a Vocabulary Builder on “characterization”.

 

If students are still struggling, lead them in identifying traits of Demeter’s personality using evidence from the text.

 

Group Work:         (15 min)

Distribute the Venn diagrams for Hades & Zeus and, if they have read pretty far in the book, Mortal & Immortal Mothers. When they complete these in pairs, ask each pair to share a similarity or difference. Make sure they have evidence from the text to support the traits they name.

Conclusion/Assessment:         (15 min)
If the class has not discussed Demeter, ask them to write a paragraph in their Language Arts notebook about her personality, using evidence of characterization from the text.

 

If the group struggled and already discussed Demeter, they should write a 2 paragraph compare/contrast essay on Zeus and Hades in their notebooks. Grade as a formative assessment.

Links:

http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-9780822565703-0

 

Vocab to Watch Out For:

Traits

Evidence

Character

Gratitude

Bounty

Harvest

Reign

Lofty

Shade (unique meaning here)

Swell

Lure

Plea

Scepter

Annual

Agriculture

Mortal

Merit

Eternal

Recede

Flee

Idle

Deceptive

Fate

Pitiless

Wilt

Hospitality

divine



Lesson Reflection:

What went well?

What would you change?

What needs explanation?

Students love reading the book, both the text and the visuals.

The list of Vocab to Watch Out For can be used as a pre-test, and the list of vocab to be learned can be personalized for each student with 5-10 words they did not already know. The best is to focus on words that are more frequently used.

The class should practice saying the Greek names before reading, because otherwise they skip them and get confused about who’s who.



Lesson Resources

DemPersephoneQuestions  
510
C C underworld  
298
C C mothers  
249
C C Hades Zeus  
303
DemPersephoneQuestions  
334
DemPersephone1  
329

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