HSF-BF.A.1

Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities.*

 
135 Lesson(s)
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Linear Functions

Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
James Bialasik
Amherst, NY
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Linear functions can be used to model how a changing quantity is represented in both the graph and equation of a function.

 
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Resources (16)
linear functions1 image
   

Exponential Models Day 1 of 2

Algebra II » Unit: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Algebra II » Unit: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Amelia Jamison
Caldwell, ID
Environment: Rural
 
Big Idea:

Aarrghhh...Brains...Zombies...and Exponential Functions! Discover Exponential Functions in this Zombie themed Lesson.

 
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Resources (16)
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Writing the Equation for a Linear Function (Day 1 of 2)

Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
James Bialasik
Amherst, NY
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

This lesson shows how to approach writing the equation of a line using multiple methods.

 
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Resources (11)
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Arithmetic Sequences: Growing Dots

Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
Algebra I » Unit: Linear Functions
James Bialasik
Amherst, NY
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Students will use formulas to represent growth rate in various sequences.

 
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Resources (25)
 
Reflections (1)
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Logs, Loans, and Life Lessons!

Algebra II » Unit: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Algebra II » Unit: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Jarod Hammel
Huntington, IN
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

This engaging lesson weaves together logarithms, loans, and life lessons!

 
Favorites (4)
 
Resources (16)
logs loans and life lessons pic
   

Geometric Sequences

Algebra I » Unit: Exponential Functions
Algebra I » Unit: Exponential Functions
James Bialasik
Amherst, NY
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

If you folded a large piece of paper 50 times its thickness would be about 77 million miles...why?

 
Favorites (13)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
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The Overtime Problem

12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Get started thinking about inequalities by looking at real-world, every day examples. Represent these examples in as many different ways as possible.

 
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Resources (19)
 
Reflections (1)
multiple representations
   

Graphing and Writing Equations for Piecewise Functions

12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Now that students have examined real-world examples, ask them to apply this knowledge to more abstract functions.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
piecewise functions multiple representations
   

Organizing a List and Guess & Check

Algebra I » Unit: Systems of Equations
Algebra I » Unit: Systems of Equations
James Dunseith
Worcester, MA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

In order for guessing and checking to be useful and efficient, it’s important to have an idea of how to organize a list of possibilities.

 
Favorites (6)
 
Resources (31)
 
Reflections (1)
u5 l2 projecting sw two kinds
   

What's In an Intersection?

Algebra I » Unit: Systems of Equations
Algebra I » Unit: Systems of Equations
James Dunseith
Worcester, MA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

The "closeness" of one graph to another matches the accuracy of a guess and a check.

 
Favorites (2)
 
Resources (16)
 
Reflections (1)
u5 l3 desmos sketch on board first
   

Write Absolute Value Functions as Piecewise Functions

12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Use multiple representations to make connections between two different types of functions.

 
Favorites (2)
 
Resources (12)
absolute value function image resized
   

Quadratic Functions Review and Portfolio

12th Grade Math » Unit: More Abstract Work with Quadratic Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: More Abstract Work with Quadratic Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

What are the key ideas and skills of this unit? What do you most need to review or understand better?

 
Favorites (1)
 
Resources (7)
gravity parabola
   

More Absolute Value Graphs

12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Use graphing technology and open-ended problems to explore the graphs of absolute value functions.

 
Resources (11)
 
Reflections (1)
more absolute value image
   

The Lumber Model Problem

Algebra II » Unit: Cubic Functions
Algebra II » Unit: Cubic Functions
Jacob Nazeck
Fort Collins, CO
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

In many cases, polynomial functions are ideal mathematical models that support quantitative and abstract reasoning.

 
Favorites (3)
 
Resources (12)
 
Reflections (1)
800px logging in finnish lapland
   

Make Piecewise Functions Continuous

12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
12th Grade Math » Unit: Piecewise Functions
Hilary Yamtich
Oakland, CA
Environment: Urban
 
Big Idea:

Bring in a lot of different skills and ideas (and preview a calculus concept!) while asking students to solve problems both graphically and algebraically.

 
Favorites (1)
 
Resources (15)
 
Reflections (2)
make piecewise functions continuous student work

Determine an explicit expression, a recursive process, or steps for calculation from a context.

Combine standard function types using arithmetic operations. For example, build a function that models the temperature of a cooling body by adding a constant function to a decaying exponential, and relate these functions to the model.

(+) Compose functions. For example, if T(y) is the temperature in the atmosphere as a function of height, and h(t) is the height of a weather balloon as a function of time, then T(h(t)) is the temperature at the location of the weather balloon as a function of time.

Common Core Math
 
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