L.5.2

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

 
4 Lesson(s)
Scroll to child tags
   

Applying Knowledge: Writing Opener Paragraphs for Narrative Stories

5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
Rose Ortiz
Stockton, CA
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Writing lets us use our creativity to share our great ideas with our readers. We can write as well as the good authors if we practice their same strategies for creating great beginnings for our stories.

 
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Resources (16)
 
Reflections (1)
group 4
   

"Who's Talking to Whom?": Punctuating Dialogue

5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
Rose Ortiz
Stockton, CA
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Our readers need to be able to understand "who is talking to whom" in order to follow the sequence of events in our stories.

 
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Resources (20)
 
Reflections (1)
dialogue
   

Great Writers Need an Editor

5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
Rose Ortiz
Stockton, CA
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Mistakes are a part of life. When we get our audiences opinion on our writing we can make our stories even better.

 
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Resources (19)
 
Reflections (2)
students peer
   

Post Assessment of Narrative Writing Skills to Determine Understanding

5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
5th Grade ELA » Unit: Writing Narrative Stories to Entertain Your Readers
Rose Ortiz
Stockton, CA
Environment: Suburban
 
Big Idea:

Post assessments give us the opportunity to show others how much and how well we have learned.

 
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Resources (13)
 
Reflections (1)
students

Use punctuation to separate items in a series.*

Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence

Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Common Core ELA
 
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