Data Review: Data review Weekly Mastery Tracker.JPG

 
 
 
Weekly Mastery Tracker.JPG
Student Data
 
 
This chart is kept in front of the class and updated on a regular basis. My students can see feedback on how they performed on exit tickets and formative assessments, tracking their mastery for the week's goals. We often refer back to this chart when talking about individualized practice, referring to everyone's different levels of mastery and different needs.
  • Data review Weekly Mastery Tracker.JPG
Student Data
 
 
This chart is kept in front of the class and updated on a regular basis. My students can see feedback on how they performed on exit tickets and formative assessments, tracking their mastery for the week's goals. We often refer back to this chart when talking about individualized practice, referring to everyone's different levels of mastery and different needs.
 
Feedback Systems

Data Review

Data Review is a strategy I use to keep my students motivated to master our Math skills. Every day before class, I place a check mark by the names of students who have mastered a skill according to the previous day's Exit Ticket (please see the "Daily Exit Tickets" strategy video). During class I call out the names of students who have made progress towards mastery (only focusing on positive feedback), and we publicly celebrate those students who have reached mastery on skills that we're focusing on in that particular week. This quick cheer gives students a sense of gratification and success for their previous day's work. As for my students who haven't yet reached mastery, they hear about their peers' successes and consequently feel motivated to work harder to get a check mark for the following day. Because of the power of this quick public feedback, my students are invested in the work that they do throughout the day and the Exit Ticket they take at the end of each class. Data Review helps them see the connections between their daily effort and progress and the achievement of their overall goals.

Strategy Resources (2)
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Student Data
 
 
This chart is kept in front of the class and updated on a regular basis. My students can see feedback on how they performed on exit tickets and formative assessments, tracking their mastery for the week's goals. We often refer back to this chart when talking about individualized practice, referring to everyone's different levels of mastery and different needs.
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Data
 
 
This chart is kept in front of the class and updated on a regular basis. My students can see feedback on how they performed on exit tickets and formative assessments, tracking their mastery for the week's goals. We often refer back to this chart when talking about individualized practice, referring to everyone's different levels of mastery and different needs.
Stephen Pham
Rocketship Si Se Puede Academy
San Jose, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
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