Annotation Logs: Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf

 
 
 
Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
  • Annotation Log Native Son LOATA (Responses) - Form Responses 1.pdf
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Independent Student Learning

Annotation Logs

Annotation Logs in my class can be on paper or online, usually depending on what modality the student prefers, as well as what their access is to technology at home. Annotation Logs are a routine through which my students explore the unit text by analyzing quotes, asking questions, and making clarifications. Whether online or on paper, it is my routine to respond to their annotations. Because each student writes so many annotations throughout a unit, I have many opportunities to dip into their thinking at multiple points along the way. Annotation Logs are fundamental building blocks to some of my other classroom practices including Socratic Seminars, TIED analysis paragraphs, and essay writing. For each annotation in the log, my students must include their focus for the annotation, the quote itself, the page or line number, and the analysis. The focus of the annotation could be a literary device, a theme connection or an approach through one of the literary theory lenses we have studied. Citing the quote and where it is found makes for easy reference later on. The analysis is 3-4 sentences that shows how the quote addresses the initial focus they indicated. It is in this last part that I address any feedback by asking questions and clarifying any plot confusion.

Strategy Resources (2)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
 
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This is a screencast I created to explain Annotation Logs to my students.
Student Work Sample
 
 
This is a student example of an Annotation Log completed for "Native Son." It is the spreadsheet generated by the Google Form where they enter the information to construct a complete annotation.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Google DOCtoring

In the "Google DOCtoring" strategy, a Google Document is shared among the members of a small student group or with the whole class. My students will then collectively annotate text evidence and/or give responses to questions about the class text. This strategy pushes each student's sense of accountability to the whole group, and it challenges all of my students to be clear in expressing their thoughts in writing. Early in the school year, I use the collaborative notes from Google DOCtoring sessions to assess my students' understanding and to push individual student's thinking. Once students become accustomed to working on Google Docs together, this strategy is also an efficient way to collaborate and build text analysis together that can later be used for Socratic Seminars and essays. 

 
Instructional Openings
Opening Journal Warm-Up

While I often use a Google Form survey or an opening conversation to start class and set the tone, there is also tremendous value in having students write their individual thoughts in their Writer's Notebooks. Ours is a mostly paperless classroom despite the fact that it is an English class, so these pen-to-paper moments are significant ones. Students understand that these journal entries are silent reflections meant to put them in the frame of mind needed for the day's lessons. 

 
Feedback Systems
Video Diagnostic

My students have a high-stakes oral defense of their senior research towards the end of the spring semester, and we prepare for that all year. The Video Diagnostic is a recording of each student’s starting point in the oral presentation process and an opportunity for students to see a snippet of their presentation "selves," what their peers see as their current strengths, and what their teacher sees as their current challenges. Each Video Diagnostic includes these three parts -- the oral presentation, peer feedback, and teacher feedback. These are then packaged into one short Video Diagnostic, uploaded, and shared to the student. The student watches it all and gets a clearer sense of how they appear to an audience in terms of their tone, inflection, pacing, and eye contact. I also have them watch these diagnostics a few weeks before the high-stakes presentation as a confidence booster because all of them will have made tremendous gains in their oral presentation skills from that first diagnostic to months later when they are finalizing their presentations at the end of the year.

 
 
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