Instant Feedback: Instant Feedback.mp4

 
 
 
Instant Feedback.mp4
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast shows the behind the scenes of giving students instant feedback. It covers my use of standards and objectives to give my students constructive feedback during learning interactions.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast shows the behind the scenes of giving students instant feedback. It covers my use of standards and objectives to give my students constructive feedback during learning interactions.
 
Feedback Systems

Instant Feedback

Instant Feedback, my method for conferencing with students on a daily basis, is one of the strategies I use each day to help my students progress through the content in my largely self-paced course. I also use Instant Feedback to gauge my students' understanding of the material we are covering. As I walk around the room, I'm constantly looking at what students have written and am asking them to explain their thinking. If I need to learn more about their thinking, I ask additional questions until I identify the source of their confusion or misconceptions or until I am convinced that they are on the right track. This year I have begun to experiment with a protocol called "SE2R" (Summarize, Explain, Redirect, Resubmit) to structure some of my Instant Feedback to my students and to help them identify their next steps.

Strategy Resources (2)
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast shows the behind the scenes of giving students instant feedback. It covers my use of standards and objectives to give my students constructive feedback during learning interactions.
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This screencast shows the behind the scenes of giving students instant feedback. It covers my use of standards and objectives to give my students constructive feedback during learning interactions.
Jessica Anderson
Powell County High School
Deer Lodge, MT


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Ninth grade
Similar Strategies
Stakeholder Collaboration
Jessi's Approach to Collaboration & Communication

Communicating and collaborating with both colleagues and students' families, is crucial in a blended environment. This is especially true if a teacher is doing something that looks very different from other teachers at her school. Check out how Jessi communicates and collaborates with both her colleagues at school and her students' families and how her methods of communication and collaboration have evolved over time.

 
Time and Space
Classroom Zones

My classroom space is broken into five distinct areas based on students’ needs. The areas are named in accordance with the storyline in our academic game: (1) presentation area (also known as the shelter), (2) lounge area (the beach), (3) counter area (the lookout), (4) teacher area (crash site), and the (5) table area (the jungle). Each area was set up with a distinct vision in mind. The shelter was set-up with two futons and a coffee table all located around the SmartBoard at the front of the classroom. I envisioned this area as a place where student groups could share their learning and present content using their iPads and our Apple TV. The beach area was created to help those students who do better lounging on a couch or in a non-traditional chair while working. I wanted my room to represent the traditional as well as the “non-traditional” student. The lookout area was specifically set-up for students who enjoy to look outside and see nature as they work. It also works well for those who use scenery as a reset in an environment that is often controlled chaos. The crash site was created as a result of the storyline where all students became Plane Crash Survivors (PCSs). The name makes it okay to have a messy desk! It’s also used as a space to separate distracting students from the attention of others in the classroom. Finally, the table area was made for the more traditional student who likes to work at a table or desk or likes to have a hard surface to work on. Throughout class, students can be seen moving throughout the room in accordance with their needs as a learner at that particular moment. I feel the incorporation of the different areas of the classroom helps to build a culture of learning acceptance and risk. It opens up the classroom to being more than just a sit and get environment. It helps to personalize and shape students’ learning. See also Jessi's Overview Model.

 
Assessment & Data
Battling the Boss

Battling the Boss is a formative assessment strategy I use at the end of almost every level in our academic game. It's a process that allows students to prove that they understand the material covered in each level. Battling the Boss usually consists of me asking the student who has indicated that s/he is ready to "battle" one or two questions that require the student to demonstrate the skills I'm looking for them to develop in the level. If students prove that they understand the material, I let them move onto the next level. The students then put their names on the next level's poster, which is a public demonstration of each student's progress in the course. If students are not successful, they have the opportunity to do additional preparation and Battle the Boss when they have mastered the content.  

 
 
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