Quick Write Summary: Quick Write Summary.pptx

 
 
 
9.3.Isotopes and Radioactive Decay.ppt.pptx.pptx
Presentation
 
 
The process modeled in this PowerPoint lesson involves an investigation into the concept that aligns with the unit theme. Students will then compare the results of their activity to their peers' results and the class will discuss what accepted explanations exist in academia. At the conclusion of that brief introduction, students get a chance to summarize their thoughts in a low-pressure environment, allowing for students to put their thoughts on paper and get feedback from their classmates on accuracy.
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
  • Quick Write Summary.pptx
Presentation
 
 
The process modeled in this PowerPoint lesson involves an investigation into the concept that aligns with the unit theme. Students will then compare the results of their activity to their peers' results and the class will discuss what accepted explanations exist in academia. At the conclusion of that brief introduction, students get a chance to summarize their thoughts in a low-pressure environment, allowing for students to put their thoughts on paper and get feedback from their classmates on accuracy.
 
Instructional Closings

Quick Write Summary

Truly understanding science requires my students to think in ways they might not have experienced before. Conceptualizing something that our eyes can't always see is difficult, and so it's valuable to provide graphic organizers, visual models, and other support tools as resources that my students can access while diving into content. One of the richest ways to get students to build their own methods and approaches to solving problems is to allow them to think on paper. Lessons involving direct instruction are always broken into small segments with short, casual writing periods built into the end of each one. These Quick Write Summaries are meant to focus on content construction and are free of structural analysis. I don't grade them, but I'll always help students put together their thoughts and present them with questions that guide them to the answer. Writing-to-learn strategies like the Quick Write Summary help visual learners with long-term comprehension of scientific terminology and sets the stage for students demonstrating their knowledge through writing in future assessments. 

Strategy Resources (2)
 
Presentation
 
 
The process modeled in this PowerPoint lesson involves an investigation into the concept that aligns with the unit theme. Students will then compare the results of their activity to their peers' results and the class will discuss what accepted explanations exist in academia. At the conclusion of that brief introduction, students get a chance to summarize their thoughts in a low-pressure environment, allowing for students to put their thoughts on paper and get feedback from their classmates on accuracy.
 
Presentation
 
 
The process modeled in this PowerPoint lesson involves an investigation into the concept that aligns with the unit theme. Students will then compare the results of their activity to their peers' results and the class will discuss what accepted explanations exist in academia. At the conclusion of that brief introduction, students get a chance to summarize their thoughts in a low-pressure environment, allowing for students to put their thoughts on paper and get feedback from their classmates on accuracy.
Jeff Astor
Cindy and Bill Simon Technology Academy High School
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Tenth grade
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