Vocabulary Prediction Chart: CCD_Instructions.docx

 
 
 
CCD_Instructions.docx
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The cognitive content dictionary (CCD) is a great way to engage students in learning vocabulary, as it allows them to predict its meaning, write its actual meaning, and then create a sketch attached to that word. This document outlines how to implement this vocabulary teaching strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of CCD charts.
  • CCD_Instructions.docx
  • CCD_Instructions.docx
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The cognitive content dictionary (CCD) is a great way to engage students in learning vocabulary, as it allows them to predict its meaning, write its actual meaning, and then create a sketch attached to that word. This document outlines how to implement this vocabulary teaching strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of CCD charts.
 
Instructional Openings

Vocabulary Prediction Chart

In my class, we go over one word a day from the unit we’re learning. The first step is to ask the class how many have heard of the word before. After I tally the number, those students predict its meaning (without giving any contexts). I ask them to justify why they make that prediction (e..g, where have they heard that word before? What clues are they drawing their information from?). After they share their predictions, I then share with them the signal or physical movement attached to word. It then becomes the signal word of the day.

Strategy Resources (3)
Graphic Organizer
 
 
Students use this cognitive content dictionary (CCD) graphic organizer to keep in their content folders and refer to them throughout the unit.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The cognitive content dictionary (CCD) is a great way to engage students in learning vocabulary, as it allows them to predict its meaning, write its actual meaning, and then create a sketch attached to that word. This document outlines how to implement this vocabulary teaching strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of CCD charts.
Graphic Organizer
 
 
Students use this cognitive content dictionary (CCD) graphic organizer to keep in their content folders and refer to them throughout the unit.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
The cognitive content dictionary (CCD) is a great way to engage students in learning vocabulary, as it allows them to predict its meaning, write its actual meaning, and then create a sketch attached to that word. This document outlines how to implement this vocabulary teaching strategy in your classroom, as well as providing some real examples of CCD charts.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
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