Collaborative Hand Signals: ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf

 
 
 
ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
  • ClassroomTeachingStrategies.pdf
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
 
Academic Culture

Collaborative Hand Signals

Students communicate nonverbally through their hands that they agree, disagree, or want to add onto what someone previously said. Just think for a minute the amount of time we as teachers stop for interruptions. This strategy shows us that there are ways to effectively communicate with each other silently.

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Poster
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Teacher Planning Resource
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Poster
 
 
This document provides effective classroom teaching strategies for increasing and maintaining active engagement. Examples include hand and finger signals, the use of classroom space, modes of response, positive reinforcement of behavior, positive reinforcement of incorrect answers, circulation, and wait time.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Feedback Systems
Teamwork Self-Assessment Rubric

At the conclusion of our team sessions my students self-assess, give feedback/compliments to one another, and agree or share out their disagreements with one another. Our two areas of focus right now are collaboration and accountability. My students score themselves on a scale from 1-4 on these habits and then track their progress daily/weekly in order to consider their next steps or provide feedback to one another. Perhaps most importantly, the sentence stems within the rubric help my students develop a repertoire of conversational skills they will need in the 21st century and beyond.  

 
Instructional Openings
Real World Hook

One way we bring authenticity to our lessons is by making explicit connections or real world hooks to what we're learning. What I particularly enjoyed about our persuasive writing unit is that we were able to identify real problems in our own school community and to think of solutions. It then brought about real change in our school, and in this case brought about getting more magazines into the classroom which was an identified need of our class.

 
Feedback Systems
Blended Learning Treasure Wall Map

Each week the boat on our ‘Treasure BL Wall’ is moved across three islands until the boat reaches the final island where a treasure awaits the class with a hidden treasure. Once we have reached the treasure the hidden prize usually is something like a popcorn party, movie. pizza party, game time party, or class-selected incentive. This is the last part of the reflection. This part involves students deciding if we should or should not move our blended learning tracking tool towards our end goal. Our tracking tool in my class is the treasure blended learning wall, where students can see their progress and can view blended learning in a game-like way. The game involves students versus fictional characters on our map who are trying to get to the goal before we can. 

 
 
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