Chemistry Hunger Games: 1.1.Assessment.District1.doc.docx

 
 
 
1.1.Assessment.District1.doc.docx
Student Handout
 
 
Each district comes with 3 individual assessment that I administer as students complete the practice for the unit associated with the district. If students don't conquer them the first time, they're always allowed to retake another version to demonstrate mastery.
  • 1.1.Assessment.District1.doc.docx
  • 1.1.Assessment.District1.doc.docx
  • 1.1.Assessment.District1.doc.docx
Student Handout
 
 
Each district comes with 3 individual assessment that I administer as students complete the practice for the unit associated with the district. If students don't conquer them the first time, they're always allowed to retake another version to demonstrate mastery.
 
Assessment & Data

Chemistry Hunger Games

Synthesizing a year's worth of content is difficult for any student, so I always look for innovative new ways to keep my students engaged attempt to conquer all of the learning objectives in chemistry. During the 3 weeks leading up to the final exam, my classroom temporarily turns into a Chemistry Hunger Games war zone where students battle to "kill" off districts - each representing a different unit from the year. Using the chemistryhungergames.com website I designed, my students pour over videos, screencasts, text, images, simulators, and practice problems that prepare them for district assessments. Each student is allowed to take the district assessment as many times as needed to master the district’s content, and I rotate enough questions to make about 5 assessment versions for each district. Point values are assigned according to the proficiency level they achieve on their assessments - all of which are tracked online using a conditionally formatted google sheet to help monitor progress. This gamified twist to the learning process keeps students focused on the ultimate task, mastery of content, while also helping to reinforce that with enough practice and guidance, they have the ability to master anything.

Strategy Resources (4)
Online Student Resource
 
 
After learning how to code, I designed and built my class website to help students find a year's worth of content in one place. On the daily agenda page, I've embedded my versal course covering the entire year's worth of chemistry lessons - though these change each year as I adjust my curriculum.
Student Handout
 
 
This Chemistry Hunger Games Action Plan Starter is a tool I use to help students focus on what content to prioritize, and get used to analyzing their own data.
Student Handout
 
 
Each district comes with 3 individual assessment that I administer as students complete the practice for the unit associated with the district. If students don't conquer them the first time, they're always allowed to retake another version to demonstrate mastery.
Student Handout
 
 
This Chemistry Hunger Games Action Plan Starter is a tool I use to help students focus on what content to prioritize, and get used to analyzing their own data.
Student Handout
 
 
Each district comes with 3 individual assessment that I administer as students complete the practice for the unit associated with the district. If students don't conquer them the first time, they're always allowed to retake another version to demonstrate mastery.
Online Student Resource
 
 
After learning how to code, I designed and built my class website to help students find a year's worth of content in one place. On the daily agenda page, I've embedded my versal course covering the entire year's worth of chemistry lessons - though these change each year as I adjust my curriculum.
Jeff Astor
Cindy and Bill Simon Technology Academy High School
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Eleventh grade
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