Using Video To Reflect on Teaching & Learning: Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx

 
 
 
Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
Student Data
 
 
This is sample of the Scripting Notes that are transcribed from a video recording of a Socratic seminar. These notes are uploaded and shared to the students, so they can use it as a resource for their later writing assignments.
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
  • Script_SocraticSeminar_111413_Period4.docx
Student Data
 
 
This is sample of the Scripting Notes that are transcribed from a video recording of a Socratic seminar. These notes are uploaded and shared to the students, so they can use it as a resource for their later writing assignments.
 
Feedback Systems

Using Video To Reflect on Teaching & Learning

One thing students can always count on in our Socratic seminars is that they will be recorded. Preparing for the Socratic Seminar involves watching film footage of the previous seminar discussion. Students can participate more effectively if we acknowledge what they are doing right, and they buy in more deeply to the idea of using evidence to back their claims when I do the same during this preparation process. In this case, I use evidence in the form of recorded footage to demonstrate their success with some key aspects of a quality academic discussion.For this strategy, the purpose is twofold. First, though I do not re-play each and every single video, I do feel that there is value in capturing student talk that can be made available for those students who can benefit from listening to their peers. This is why I upload and share the videos to all of the students. I have often used recordings of classroom discussion to inform how I will revise the same unit for the following year.The second purpose of this strategy is so that I can script verbatim the exchanges between the students that happen in the seminar. I then provide the students this script, and they can see what we call their “isms”. For example, a student might notice that they say the word “like” or “ya know what I’m sayin’” repeatedly in the seminar. These “isms” affect how people listening to them might respond, and by capturing them on paper, it gives the students evidence of what they will want to work on in terms of the way they orally present themselves. The scripts are also a useful resource for when students are constructing analysis through writing because they or their peers might have cited a strong quote or made a critical connection on which students can build their own analysis.

Strategy Resources (2)
Teacher In Action
 
 
This Teaching Channel video highlights Johanna's practice of consistently using video to allow her students and her to reflect on their conceptual understanding and performance in her class.
 
Student Data
 
 
This is sample of the Scripting Notes that are transcribed from a video recording of a Socratic seminar. These notes are uploaded and shared to the students, so they can use it as a resource for their later writing assignments.
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
This Teaching Channel video highlights Johanna's practice of consistently using video to allow her students and her to reflect on their conceptual understanding and performance in her class.
Student Data
 
 
This is sample of the Scripting Notes that are transcribed from a video recording of a Socratic seminar. These notes are uploaded and shared to the students, so they can use it as a resource for their later writing assignments.
Johanna Paraiso
Fremont High School Oakland
Oakland, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Twelfth grade
Similar Strategies
Instructional Planning
Socratic Seminar Prep

Socratic Seminars can be amazing learning experiences for students when they take the time to prepare what they will contribute to the conversation. Once the seminar prompt has been clarified, each student gets ready by reviewing their Annotation Logs to identify what evidence and analysis addresses the prompt. This preparation often takes 15 minutes, and during that time students use a graphic organizer to develop the key points they want to contribute. Regardless of how many Socratic Seminars we may have already done in the class, we always review the norms to ensure that the time we spend in dialogue is useful and inclusive.

 
Whole-Group Instruction
Teacher Tracking of Socratic Seminar

The Socratic Seminar is completely student-run in my class, and I alternate between the inner/outer circle format and a single-circle format. As the teacher, I play the role of videographer and when there is only one circle, I publicly track the quality of student comments on the white board throughout the conversation. This is an effective way to let students know when their thinking is becoming more and more insightful. I use the colors green, orange, and red to color code the tally marks I make on the board. Green means that the student offered a comment that made sense and was explained well. Orange signifies that the students cited evidence with their comment, which is the goal for everyone to reach at least once in the seminar. Lastly, a red tally mark next to a student's name means that the student not only used evidence when they commented but also offered a keen insight using that text evidence. This kind of in-the-moment tracking encourages the students to really think about how to share thoughts in the Seminar that will allow their peers to dig deep into the text and create meaning. They strive for the red tally because it means their brain and their contributions to the Seminar are "on fire".

 
Instructional Openings
Opening Journal Warm-Up

While I often use a Google Form survey or an opening conversation to start class and set the tone, there is also tremendous value in having students write their individual thoughts in their Writer's Notebooks. Ours is a mostly paperless classroom despite the fact that it is an English class, so these pen-to-paper moments are significant ones. Students understand that these journal entries are silent reflections meant to put them in the frame of mind needed for the day's lessons. 

 
 
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