Feedback Systems

Student Feedback Surveys

Flipped Mastery is a new model for not only the students, but for me as well - so I went into the year knowing that there needed to be a process for feedback and refinement. I created a monthly survey for students to take, what was working for them and what needed to be improved. The surveys were created on Google Forms and were made accessible on the class website home page. Based on the survey results, I made adjustments to the class structure throughout the year. When students saw their suggestions impacted how the class was run, it made them feel their voices were valued, which helped with the individual buy-in of many students.


Strategy Resources (3)
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Since students are constantly open to feedback from me, I need to hear what they need and adjustments that might improve their learning.
Student Data
 
 
The following feedback form was given to students in October. The survey results had clear trends - students liked the flexibility of self pace learning but felt the pace moved too quickly and wanted more whole class activities. These results are the reason I created "Catch Up Weeks" and scheduled time for whole class activities on a weekly basis.
Online Student Resource
 
 
Student facing feedback survey. These are the questions that were asked on a monthly basis.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
Since students are constantly open to feedback from me, I need to hear what they need and adjustments that might improve their learning.
Student Data
 
 
The following feedback form was given to students in October. The survey results had clear trends - students liked the flexibility of self pace learning but felt the pace moved too quickly and wanted more whole class activities. These results are the reason I created "Catch Up Weeks" and scheduled time for whole class activities on a weekly basis.
Online Student Resource
 
 
Student facing feedback survey. These are the questions that were asked on a monthly basis.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Academic Culture
Candy Land Path

The Candy Land Path is a Candy Land-style trail that runs across several walls in my classroom. Each tile on the trail represents a lesson my students have to master in order to advance in the course. This strategy allows my students' progress to be seen and followed on a day-to-day basis, ultimately giving transparency to the learning process. This is a powerful visual tool for every student - especially for over- and under-achievers - and allows me to reframe school as a learning journey and progression as opposed to just working for a grade. The Path also brings an element of fun to the classroom while preserving its motivational purpose. 

 
Instructional Closings
Quick Write Summary

Truly understanding science requires my students to think in ways they might not have experienced before. Conceptualizing something that our eyes can't always see is difficult, and so it's valuable to provide graphic organizers, visual models, and other support tools as resources that my students can access while diving into content. One of the richest ways to get students to build their own methods and approaches to solving problems is to allow them to think on paper. Lessons involving direct instruction are always broken into small segments with short, casual writing periods built into the end of each one. These Quick Write Summaries are meant to focus on content construction and are free of structural analysis. I don't grade them, but I'll always help students put together their thoughts and present them with questions that guide them to the answer. Writing-to-learn strategies like the Quick Write Summary help visual learners with long-term comprehension of scientific terminology and sets the stage for students demonstrating their knowledge through writing in future assessments. 

 
Instructional Openings
Demo Discussion

The Demo Discussion is a strategy I use to provide an interesting and memorable in-class demonstration of complex concepts that my students will learn about in class on a given day, using a variety of digital resources. The Demo Discussion is an excellent way to promote student curiosity about scientific phenomena. The "demos" provide access points for my students to witness and wonder about complicated chemical processes that they will eventually explore and understand at a much deeper level. By leveraging additional physical and digital tools, I can facilitate in-depth analysis and support the development of models to explain the science behind the demo. This strategy also allows me to surface my students' questions and interests about the day's Learning Targets (please see the "Learning Targets" strategy video), to which I can refer and make connections throughout our exploration of that content.

 
 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close