Instructional Planning

Basketball Problem

The basketball problem is a built in way to teach the students about rigor. At the beginning of the year, we discussed how math is like an onion.  There are many layers and each one is more complex than the last. The "shot" is an opportunity to reward risk-taking and get the students really thinking about the most high-complexity questions that I can ask. For this reason, students are doubly invested in this part of class. One because they want to challenge themselves, and two because they want to get up there and take the shot. 

Strategy Resources (2)
Students In Action
 
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Here is a sample question we would use for Basketball. Only the most rigorous questions make it up, and students know that in this class, it is ok if you miss!
 
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
Here is a sample question we would use for Basketball. Only the most rigorous questions make it up, and students know that in this class, it is ok if you miss!
Daniel Utset-Guerrero
Holmes Elementary School
Miami, FL


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Fifth grade
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