Instructional Openings

Learning Targets

Learning Targets are specific skill goals that align the work we do each day with the long-term goals my students and I have set at the beginning of the year. This strategy is a part of the larger mastery system in place in my self-paced blended learning classroom. By dissecting large skills into smaller Learning Targets, my students are more effectively able to self-assess their progress towards mastery in each of these skills. By emphasizing assessment for learning and achievement at high levels on specific Learning Targets, we take the focus off of assessment for the sole purpose of grading and gradually replace it with student ownership of their learning.

Strategy Resources (3)
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is the learning target log that helps my students with comprehension of the learning targets associated with our thermodynamics unit. My students will self assess over the course of our learning cycle and should continuously evaluate their own proficiency level. These help generate dialogue around how my students can improve their subsequent work.
Student Handout
 
 
After completing activities for a given unit aligned to the established learning targets, my students will take a quantitative exam that is purposefully aligned to those same learning targets as well. By organizing the questions into groups of learning targets, I reinforce the interconnectivity of chemistry standards and highlight how mastery can be demonstrated in exam form.
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is the learning target log that helps my students with comprehension of the learning targets associated with our thermodynamics unit. My students will self assess over the course of our learning cycle and should continuously evaluate their own proficiency level. These help generate dialogue around how my students can improve their subsequent work.
Student Handout
 
 
After completing activities for a given unit aligned to the established learning targets, my students will take a quantitative exam that is purposefully aligned to those same learning targets as well. By organizing the questions into groups of learning targets, I reinforce the interconnectivity of chemistry standards and highlight how mastery can be demonstrated in exam form.
Jeff Astor
Cindy and Bill Simon Technology Academy High School
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
Science
Grade:
Tenth grade
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Feedback Systems
On The Spot Feedback

Because each of my students is at a different point in the curriculum, it is very important that I make myself available when students need support and feedback. Fortunately, my blended learning model creates many opportunities for my co-teacher and me to work one-on-one with students and with small groups of students every day. On the Spot Feedback is my strategy for connecting with each student in my class every day and offering immediate feedback on their Mastery Quizzes and Level Tests. This strategy allows me and the student I'm working with to understand, in a very personal and precise way, where sources of confusion exist so we can discuss and address these issues before the student moves on to the next lesson.

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Buddy Time

By its very nature, learning in a self-paced classroom with digital resources can be an isolating experience for some students. While I want my students to take personal responsibility for and ownership of their learning, I also want them to learn essential collaboration skills and to leverage social learning to grow as people and as students of Mathematics. Buddy Time is a grouping strategy that requires my students to collaborate with peers working on the same lesson at a prescribed point in each lesson. During Buddy Time, students can collaborate or discuss their work with other students at their tables and they can use their collective knowledge and skills to help each other move towards mastery. 

 
Assessment & Data
Pop The Bubble

The flipped mastery model gives students loads of time to work independently, so every few weeks we like to bring the class together to play a game. Pop The Bubble, which my coteacher Mr. Elizondo came up with, is hands down the students' favorite. Each team of students gets 5 bubbles, and when they get a question right, they can pop another teams' bubble. The last team with bubbles remaining wins the game. It's a great twist on the traditional Kahoots quiz game.


 
 
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