Routines and Procedures

Computer Captains for Transitions

Computer Captains for Transitions is a routine I have developed that allows my students to take on an important peer leadership role that, at the same time, helps minimize the amount of time that my students spend in transition from working independently on a computer to joining their group on the rug for direct instruction or vice versa. Using the Computer Captains for Transitions strategy, which involves designated students alerting their peers to the timing of routinized whole-class transitions, allows my students to develop more ownership over their own learning and the culture of the class. Used in combination with timing transitions and re-doing unsuccessful transitions, this strategy has helped me re-capture critical learning time in my blended learning classroom. 

Strategy Resources (3)
Student Handout
 
 
This is the Computer Captain job description that I share with my students. It states that the captain is responsible for ensuring a good transition to and from the computers by saying "All aboard!" when the transition has started, timing students during the transition, and positively reinforcing those who transition correctly. The Computer Captain also signals when it is "All cleared!" to begin using computers.
Student Handout
 
 
My students use this Student Job Application to "apply" for jobs in my classroom. They have to explain why they want the job, as well as list their qualifications, prior job experiences, and other jobs they may also like to have.
Student Handout
 
 
This is the Computer Captain job description that I share with my students. It states that the captain is responsible for ensuring a good transition to and from the computers by saying "All aboard!" when the transition has started, timing students during the transition, and positively reinforcing those who transition correctly. The Computer Captain also signals when it is "All cleared!" to begin using computers.
Student Handout
 
 
My students use this Student Job Application to "apply" for jobs in my classroom. They have to explain why they want the job, as well as list their qualifications, prior job experiences, and other jobs they may also like to have.
Mark Montero
Aspire Titan Academy
Los Angeles, CA


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Moderate
Subject:
English / Language Arts
Grade:
Third grade
Similar Strategies
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Rotational Model with Two Groups

We began to pilot blended learning three years ago starting with K-2. So our 3rd grade students have had three years of blended learning and we have a solidified understanding of what works. At Aspire Titan Academy, we use a rotational model in both math and ELA, which provides students 90 to 120 minutes of individual computer time daily. In both math and ELA, students are divided into two group, each spending half their time in teacher-led instruction and the remainder of working on the computers. While they’re on the computers, students use either DreamBox Learning (math), i-Ready or myON (reading), or an enrichment program, such as a typing software program.

Number of Students: 26 students

Number of Adults: one teacher; various other adults support during specific times (e.g., Blended Learning Coordinator, Special Education Teachers, etc.)

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 120 minutes (Reading and Writing Block)

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: MyOn; i-Ready

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: Lenovo ThinkPads (1:2 ratio); SMARTboard; Document Camera; iPad (for teacher)

Key Features: station rotation; student agency

 
Collaborative Student Groups
Observation Chart

Observation charts are a type of inquiry chart that stimulate students’ curiosity. They build background information while providing teachers with a diagnostic tool. And they provide opportunities for language support from peers. During an observation chart, I use real pictures or paintings attached to white poster paper or butcher paper that contain a theme (e.g., food from a culture, ways of transportation, games a culture plays, etc.). My students walk around from observation chart to observation chart and write down either a question they're wondering about, a comment they'd like to make, or just an observation (i.e., statement of fact).  

 
Small-Group Instruction
Small Group Intervention

This strategy is a small group guided instruction, or in student friendly language, team time with Mr. Esparza. A group of 3-4 students is pulled as other teams are conducting a differentiated math investigation. Students are given a selection of materials to create models and formulate ideas. We work as a collective to identify our misconceptions by asking ourselves questions, explaining why, and checking for understanding. As a scaffold, students use hand signals and our learning goal success rubrics to check themselves for understanding throughout the process.

 
 
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